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Open Access Case report

Treatment of two postoperative endophthalmitis cases due to Aspergillus flavus and Scopulariopsis spp. with local and systemic antifungal therapy

Sayime Aydin1, Bulent Ertugrul2*, Berna Gultekin3, Guliz Uyar4 and Erkin Kir5

Author Affiliations

1 The Hospital of Dumlupinar University, Department of Ophthalmology, Kutahya, Turkey

2 Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty, Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Aydin, Turkey

3 Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty, Department of Microbiology and Clinical Microbiology, Aydin, Turkey

4 Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty, Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Aydin, Turkey

5 Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty, Department of Ophthalmology, Aydin, Turkey

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2007, 7:87  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-7-87

Published: 31 July 2007

Abstract

Background

Endophthalmitis is the inflammatory response to invasion of the eye with bacteria or fungi. The incidence of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery varies between 0.072–0.13 percent. Treatment of endophthalmitis with fungal etiology is difficult.

Case Presentation

Case 1: A 71-year old male diabetic patient developed postoperative endophthalmitis due to Aspergillus flavus. The patient was treated with topical amphotericin B ophthalmic solution, intravenous (IV) liposomal amphotericin-B and caspofungin following vitrectomy.

Case 2: A 72-year old male cachectic patient developed postoperative endophthalmitis due to Scopulariopsis spp. The patient was treated with topical and IV voriconazole and caspofungin.

Conclusion

Aspergillus spp. are responsible of postoperative fungal endophthalmitis. Endophthalmitis caused by Scopulariopsis spp. is a very rare condition. The two cases were successfully treated with local and systemic antifungal therapy.