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Open Access Case report

Localized primary renal aspergillosis in a diabetic patient following lithotripsy – a case report

Jalaluddin A Haq12*, Mohammad AM Khan3, Nazma Afroze4 and Tahniyah Haq5

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Microbiology, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, 122, Kazi Nazrul Islam Avenue, Dhaka, Bangladesh

2 School of Health Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian 16150, Kelantan, Malaysia

3 Department of Urology, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, 122, Kazi Nazrul Islam Avenue, Dhaka, Bangladesh

4 Department of Pathology, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, 122, Kazi Nazrul Islam Avenue, Dhaka, Bangladesh

5 DCCS unit, Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, 122, Kazi Nazrul Islam Avenue, Dhaka, Bangladesh

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2007, 7:58  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-7-58

Published: 14 June 2007

Abstract

Background

Primary renal aspergillosis is rare in diabetic patients. Diagnosis of localized primary renal Aspergillus infection in diabetic patients requires careful investigations due to its benign presentation and lack of associated systemic clinical features. There is also paucity of information on the role of conservative treatment of such localized infection with antifungal agents only. Here, we describe a case of localized renal aspergillosis in a type 2 diabetic patient with a brief review of literature.

Case presentation

We describe a case of unilateral renal aspergillosis following intracorporeal pneumatic lithotripsy (ICPL) in a type 2 diabetic man. The patient presented with mild pain in the left lumbar region and periodic expulsion of whitish soft masses per urethra, which yielded growth of Aspergillus fumigatus. He was treated initially with amphotericin B; however, it was stopped after 2 weeks, as he could not tolerate the drug. Subsequently, he was successfully treated with oral itraconazole.

Conclusion

Localized renal aspergillosis may be suspected in diabetic patients having history of urinary tract instrumentation, mild lumbar pain, passage of suspicious masses in urine and persistent pyuria. Examination of the suspicious substances expelled per urethra is essential for diagnosis as routine multiple urine analysis may yield negative results. Conservative treatment with oral itraconazole alone is effective in cases with incomplete obstruction.