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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Evaluation of a pulsed-xenon ultraviolet room disinfection device for impact on contamination levels of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Chetan Jinadatha1*, Ricardo Quezada2, Thomas W Huber1, Jason B Williams3, John E Zeber12 and Laurel A Copeland12

Author Affiliations

1 Central Texas Veterans Health Care System, Temple, Texas 76504, USA

2 Scott & White Center for Applied Health Research, Temple, Texas 96502, USA

3 Antimicrobial Test Laboratories, LLC, Round Rock, Texas 78681, USA

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2014, 14:187  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-14-187

Published: 7 April 2014

Abstract

Background

Healthcare-acquired infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a significant cause of increased mortality, morbidity and additional health care costs in United States. Surface decontamination technologies that utilize pulsed xenon ultraviolet light (PPX-UV) may be effective at reducing microbial burden. The purpose of this study was to compare standard manual room-cleaning to PPX-UV disinfection technology for MRSA and bacterial heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) on high-touch surfaces in patient rooms.

Methods

Rooms vacated by patients that had a MRSA-positive polymerase chain reaction or culture during the current hospitalization and at least a 2-day stay were studied. 20 rooms were then treated according to one of two protocols: standard manual cleaning or PPX-UV. This study evaluated the reduction of MRSA and HPC taken from five high-touch surfaces in rooms vacated by MRSA-positive patients, as a function of cleaning by standard manual methods vs a PPX-UV area disinfection device.

Results

Colony counts in 20 rooms (10 per arm) prior to cleaning varied by cleaning protocol: for HPC, manual (mean = 255, median = 278, q1-q3 132–304) vs PPX-UV (mean = 449, median = 365, q1-q3 332–530), and for MRSA, manual (mean = 127; median = 28.5; q1-q3 8–143) vs PPX-UV (mean = 108; median = 123; q1-q3 14–183). PPX-UV was superior to manual cleaning for MRSA (adjusted incident rate ratio [IRR] = 7; 95% CI <1-41) and for HPC (IRR = 13; 95% CI 4–48).

Conclusion

PPX-UV technology appears to be superior to manual cleaning alone for MRSA and HPC. Incorporating 15 minutes of PPX-UV exposure time to current hospital room cleaning practice can improve the overall cleanliness of patient rooms with respect to selected micro-organisms.

Keywords:
MRSA; Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; No touch disinfection; Pulsed xenon ultraviolet disinfection device; Nosocomial infections