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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

A comparison of microbiology and demographics among patients with healthcare-associated, hospital-acquired, and ventilator-associated pneumonia: a retrospective analysis of 1184 patients from a large, international study

Andrew A Quartin123, Ernesto G Scerpella4, Sailaja Puttagunta4 and Daniel H Kett123*

Author Affiliations

1 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami, Jackson Memorial Hospital, 1611 NW 12th Avenue, C455A, Miami, FL 33156, USA

2 Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Miami, FL, USA

3 Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL, USA

4 Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, USA

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2013, 13:561  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-13-561

Published: 27 November 2013

Abstract

Background

Acceptance of healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) as an entity and the associated risk of infection by potentially multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter have been debated. We therefore compared patients with HCAP, hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) enrolled in a trial comparing linezolid with vancomycin for treatment of pneumonia.

Methods

The analysis included all patients who received study drug. HCAP was defined as pneumonia occurring < 48 hours into hospitalization and acquired in a long-term care, subacute, or intermediate health care facility; following recent hospitalization; or after chronic dialysis.

Results

Data from 1184 patients (HCAP = 199, HAP = 379, VAP = 606) were analyzed. Compared with HAP and VAP patients, those with HCAP were older, had slightly higher severity scores, and were more likely to have comorbidities. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common gram-negative organism isolated in all pneumonia classes [HCAP, 22/199 (11.1%); HAP, 28/379 (7.4%); VAP, 57/606 (9.4%); p = 0.311]. Acinetobacter spp. were also found with similar frequencies across pneumonia groups. To address potential enrollment bias toward patients with MRSA pneumonia, we grouped patients by presence or absence of MRSA and found little difference in frequencies of Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter.

Conclusions

In this population of pneumonia patients, the frequencies of MDR gram-negative pathogens were similar among patients with HCAP, HAP, or VAP. Our data support inclusion of HCAP within nosocomial pneumonia guidelines and the recommendation that empiric antibiotic regimens for HCAP should be similar to those for HAP and VAP.

Keywords:
Nosocomial pneumonia; Healthcare-associated pneumonia; Intensive care; Hospital-acquired pneumonia; Ventilator-associated pneumonia