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This article is part of the supplement: Proceedings of the Second Workshop of the Regional Study Group on HCV in the Calabria Region (Southern Italy). The virus-host-therapy pathway in HCV disease management: from bench to bedside in the era of Directly Acting Antivirals

Open Access Review

Natural history and clinical response: “It’s the virus, stupid, or is it the host?”

Stefania Nucara1, Benedetto Caroleo2, Vincenzo Guadagnino23, Nicola Perrotti14 and Francesco Trapasso13*

Author affiliations

1 Unità Operativa di Genetica Medica, Policlinico Universitario Mater Domini, Università “Magna Græcia” di Catanzaro, Campus S. Venuta, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy

2 Unità Operativa di Malattie Infettive, University Hospital Policlinico Mater Domini, Policlinico Universitario Mater Domini, Università “Magna Græcia” di Catanzaro, Campus S. Venuta, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy

3 Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Università “Magna Græcia” di Catanzaro, Campus S. Venuta, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy

4 Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Università “Magna Græcia” di Catanzaro, Campus S. Venuta, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy

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Citation and License

BMC Infectious Diseases 2012, 12(Suppl 2):S6  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-12-S2-S6

Published: 12 November 2012

Abstract

A major goal of modern medicine is the application of personalized therapies, consisting of decisions and practices tailored to the individual patient. Information about genetic variants, either mutant or polymorphic, represents the basis for the development of this clinical approach. Recently, several independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the IL28B locus associated with HCV containment, spontaneous clearance, treatment response, and disease progression. In this minireview we will concisely discuss some critical genetic concepts that may have possible implications for clinical decisions in the treatment of HCV infection.