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Open Access Research article

Prevention and treatment of surgical site infection in HIV-infected patients

Lei Zhang1, Bao-Chi Liu1*, Xiao-Yan Zhang2, Lei Li1, Xian-Jun Xia1 and Rui-Zhang Guo1

Author Affiliations

1 Surgery Department, Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center affiliated to Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China

2 Scientific Research Center, Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center affiliated to Fudan University, Shanghai, 201508, China

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2012, 12:115  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-12-115

Published: 14 May 2012

Abstract

Background

Surgical site infection (SSI) are the third most frequently reported nosocomial infection, and the most common on surgical wards. HIV-infected patients may increase the possibility of developing SSI after surgery. There are few reported date on incidence and the preventive measures of SSI in HIV-infected patients. This study was to determine the incidence and the associated risk factors for SSI in HIV-infected patients. And we also explored the preventive measures.

Methods

A retrospective study of SSI was conducted in 242 HIV-infected patients including 17 patients who combined with hemophilia from October 2008 to September 2011 in Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. SSI were classified according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria and identified by bedside surveillance and post-discharge follow-up. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL).

Results

The SSI incidence rate was 47.5% (115 of 242); 38.4% incisional SSIs, 5.4% deep incisional SSIs and 3.7% organ/space SSIs. The SSI incidence rate was 37.9% in HIV-infected patients undergoing abdominal operation. Patients undergoing abdominal surgery with lower preoperative CD4 counts were more likely to develop SSIs. The incidence increased from 2.6% in clean wounds to 100% in dirty wounds. In the HIV-infected patients combined with hemophilia, the mean preoperative albumin and postoperative hemoglobin were found significantly lower than those in no-SSIs group (P<0.05).

Conclusions

SSI is frequent in HIV-infected patients. And suitable perioperative management may decrease the SSIs incidence rate of HIV-infected patients.