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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Occupational injury history and universal precautions awareness: a survey in Kabul hospital staff

Ahmad Shah Salehi1* and Paul Garner2

Author Affiliations

1 Ministry of Public Health, Kabul, Afghanistan

2 International Health Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2010, 10:19  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-10-19

Published: 30 January 2010

Abstract

Background

Health staff in Afghanistan may be at high risk of needle stick injury and occupational infection with blood borne pathogens, but we have not found any published or unpublished data.

Methods

Our aim was to measure the percentage of healthcare staff reporting sharps injuries in the preceding 12 months, and to explore what they knew about universal precautions. In five randomly selected government hospitals in Kabul a total of 950 staff participated in the study. Data were analyzed with Epi Info 3.

Results

Seventy three percent of staff (72.6%, 491/676) reported sharps injury in the preceding 12 months, with remarkably similar levels between hospitals and staff cadres in the 676 (71.1%) people responding. Most at risk were gynaecologist/obstetricians (96.1%) followed by surgeons (91.1%), nurses (80.2%), dentists (75.4%), midwives (62.0%), technicians (50.0%), and internist/paediatricians (47.5%). Of the injuries reported, the commonest were from hollow-bore needles (46.3%, n = 361/780), usually during recapping. Almost a quarter (27.9%) of respondents had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B. Basic knowledge about universal precautions were found insufficient across all hospitals and cadres.

Conclusion

Occupational health policies for universal precautions need to be implemented in Afghani hospitals. Staff vaccination against hepatitis B is recommended.