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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Lives saved by Global Fund-supported HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria programs: estimation approach and results between 2003 and end-2007

Ryuichi Komatsu1*, Eline L Korenromp1, Daniel Low-Beer1, Catherine Watt2, Christopher Dye2, Richard W Steketee3, Bernard L Nahlen4, Rob Lyerla5, Jesus M Garcia-Calleja6, John Cutler17 and Bernhard Schwartländer18

Author Affiliations

1 The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, Chemin Blandonnet 8, 1214 Vernier, Geneva, Switzerland

2 World Health Organization, Stop TB Department, Geneva, Switzerland

3 Program for Appropriate Technology in Health, MACEPA, Ferney-Voltaire, France

4 President's Malaria Initiative, USAID, Washington DC, USA

5 Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS, Policy, Evidence and Partnerships Department, Geneva, Switzerland

6 World Health Organization, HIV/AIDS Department, Geneva, Switzerland

7 Health Metric Network Secretariat, Geneva, Switzerland

8 Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS, China country office, Beijing, China

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BMC Infectious Diseases 2010, 10:109  doi:10.1186/1471-2334-10-109

Published: 30 April 2010

Abstract

Background

Since 2003, the Global Fund has supported the scale-up of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria control in low- and middle-income countries. This paper presents and discusses a methodology for estimating the lives saved through selected service deliveries reported to the Global Fund.

Methods

Global Fund-supported programs reported, by end-2007, 1.4 million HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral treatment (ARV), 3.3 million new smear-positive tuberculosis cases detected in DOTS (directly observed TB treatment, short course) programs, and 46 million insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) delivered. We estimated the corresponding lives saved using adaptations of existing epidemiological estimation models.

Results

By end-2007, an estimated 681,000 lives (95% uncertainty range 619,000-774,000) were saved and 1,097,000 (993,000-1,249,000) life-years gained by ARV. DOTS treatment would have saved 1.63 million lives (1.09 - 2.17 million) when compared against no treatment, or 408,000 lives (265,000-551,000) when compared against non-DOTS treatment. ITN distributions in countries with stable endemic falciparum malaria were estimated to have achieved protection from malaria for 26 million of child-years at risk cumulatively, resulting in 130,000 (27,000-232,000) under-5 deaths prevented.

Conclusions

These results illustrate the scale of mortality effects that supported programs may have achieved in recent years, despite margins of uncertainty and covering only selected intervention components. Evidence-based evaluation of disease impact of the programs supported by the Global Fund with international and in-country partners must be strengthened using population-level data on intervention coverage and demographic outcomes, information on quality of services, and trends in disease burdens recorded in national health information systems.