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Open Access Highly Accessed Case report

Rare gallbladder adenomyomatosis presenting as atypical cholecystitis: case report

Sheng-Hong Lin1, Feng-Yee Chang2, Ya-Sung Yang2, Jong-Shiaw Jin3 and Teng-Wei Chen4*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

2 Division of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Department of Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

3 Department of Pathology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

4 Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan

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BMC Gastroenterology 2011, 11:106  doi:10.1186/1471-230X-11-106

Published: 5 October 2011

Abstract

Background

Gallbladder adenomyomatosis is a benign condition characterized by hyperplastic change in the gallbladder wall and overgrowth of the mucosa because of an unknown cause. Patients with gallbladder adenomyomatosis usually present with abdominal pain. However, we herein describe a case of a patient with gallbladder adenomyomatosis who did not present with abdominal pain, but with only fever.

Case presentation

A 34-year-old man presented to our hospital with a fever. No abdominal discomfort was declared. His physical examination showed no abnormalities. Ultrasound of the abdomen revealed thickness of the gallbladder. Acute cholecystitis was diagnosed. The fever persisted even after 1 week of antibiotic therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen showed gallbladder adenomyomatosis with intramural Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses. Exploratory laparotomy with cholecystectomy was performed. The fever recovered and no residual symptoms were reported at the 3-year follow-up.

Conclusions

Gallbladder adenomyomatosis can present with fever as the only symptom. Although the association between gallbladder adenomyomatosis and malignancy has yet to be elucidated, previous reports have shown a strong association between gallbladder carcinoma and a subtype of gallbladder adenomyomatosis. Surgical intervention remains the first-choice treatment for patients with gallbladder adenomyomatosis.