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Open Access Debate

Palliative care in urgent need of recognition and development in general practice: the example of Germany

Nils Schneider1*, Geoffrey K Mitchell2 and Scott A Murray3

Author Affiliations

1 End-of-life Care Research Group, Institute of Epidemiology, Social Medicine and Health System Research, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany

2 Discipline of General Practice, University of Queensland School of Medicine, Queensland, Australia

3 Primary Palliative Care Research Group, Centre for Populations Health Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

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BMC Family Practice 2010, 11:66  doi:10.1186/1471-2296-11-66

Published: 15 September 2010

Abstract

Background

Specialist palliative care is being increasingly recognised and developed to improve end-of-life care in many developed countries. However, only a small proportion of the total number of patients with incurable, progressive diseases actually has direct contact with specialist palliative care practitioners. Using the German situation as an example, the main purpose of this paper is to argue that the emphasis on specialist palliative care services without a similar encouragement of primary palliative care will deliver a constrained service.

Discussion

For the vast majority of people with incurable, progressive diseases, good palliative care delivered by General Practitioners and community nurses, with access to specialist support when needed, is the optimal response. In Germany, specialist palliative care in the community was established in the 2007 health care reforms. However actual and potential delivery of palliative care by general practitioners and community based nurses has been sorely neglected. The time-consuming care of palliative patients and their families is currently far from accurately reflected in German, indeed most European primary care payment systems. However, it is not just a question of adequate financial compensation but also of the recognition of the fundamental value of this intense form of holistic family medicine.

Summary

It is imperative palliative care carried out by community nurses and general practitioners is better recognised by health professionals, health insurers, government and the scientific community as a central part of the delivery of health care for people in the last phase of life. Health systems should be arranged so that this critical role of general practice and primary care is intentionally fostered. Palliative care carried out by generalists needs an identity at an academic and practical level, developing in concert with specialist palliative care.