Table 2

Sociodemographic, handedness, intelligence, and affectivity data of patients (N = 30) and controls (N = 35), and clinical data for patients; mean ± SD (range); p: significance of two sample t-test (or chi-square test) comparing patients and controls
Patients Controls p
Age 30.9 ± 7.6 (18–51) 29.6 ± 8.4 (19–49) 0.515
Education years 13.3 ± 2.4 (9–18) 14.6 ± 2.4 (9–18) 0.041*
Parental education years1 14.6 ± 2.8 (10–18) 14.9 ± 2.7 (11–18) 0.74
Sex (m/f) 17/13 23/12 0.61
Handedness (right/left) 29/1 33/2 1.000
Verbal intelligence2 108.1 ± 14.2 (88–136) 112.5 ± 11.9 (95–136) 0.17
BDI 12.5 ± 7.2 (0–28) 2.1 ± 2.8 (0–10) <0.001*
STAI-T 47.4 ± 9.0 (25–71) 29.9 ± 6.5 (22–45) <0.001*
SANS3 – flat affect 2.2 ± 1.2 (0–5)
SANS – alogia 1.8 ± 1.0 (0–4)
SANS – apathy 2.1 ± 0.6 (1–3)
SANS – anhedonia 2.0 ± 1.0 (0–4)
SANS – attention 1.9 ± 0.7 (0–3)
SAPS – hallucinations 0.3 ± 0.5 (0–2)
SAPS – delusions 1.2 ± 0.8 (0–3)
SAPS – bizarre behavior 0.7 ± 0.8 (0–2)
SAPS – formal thought disorders 1.8 ± 1.1 (0–4)
Years of illness 6.7 ± 5.7 (0.5-19.0)

1Years of education of the parent with the highest degree. Data missing for two patients.

2Assessed with the Mehrfachwahl-Wortschatz-Intelligenztest (MWT-B [33]).

3All SANS and SAPS scores represent global ratings of the symptom.

*p < .05 (two-tailed).

Suslow et al.

Suslow et al. BMC Neuroscience 2013 14:140   doi:10.1186/1471-2202-14-140

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