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Utilizing novel diversity estimators to quantify multiple dimensions of microbial biodiversity across domains

Hannah M Doll1*, David W Armitage2, Rebecca A Daly345, Joanne B Emerson67, Daniela S Aliaga Goltsman18, Alexis P Yelton19, Jennifer Kerekes3, Mary K Firestone14 and Matthew D Potts1

Author Affiliations

1 Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

2 Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

3 Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

4 Ecology Department, Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

5 Current address: Department of Microbiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA

6 Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA

7 Current address: Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA

8 Current address: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA

9 Current address: Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA

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BMC Microbiology 2013, 13:259  doi:10.1186/1471-2180-13-259

Published: 15 November 2013

Additional files

Additional file 1: Table S1:

– Results of the community composition analyses (Jaccard and Unifrac) for the four environmental microbial community datasets. Figure S1. – Acid mine drainage bacteria and archaea (GAIIx) diversity profiles. Figure S2. – Hypersaline lake viruses methyltransferase diversity profiles. Figure S3. – Hypersaline lake viruses concanavalin A-like glucanases/lectins diversity profiles. Figure S4. – Substrate-associated soil fungi forest diversity profiles. Figure S5. – Acid mine drainage bacteria and archaea (HiSeq) phylogenetic (UniFrac) and taxonomic (Jaccard) hierarchical dissimilarity clusters. Figure S6. – Acid mine drainage bacteria and archaea (GAIIx) phylogenetic (UniFrac) and taxonomic (Jaccard) hierarchical dissimilarity clusters. Figure S7. – Hypersaline lake viruses Cluster 667 phylogenetic (UniFrac) and taxonomic (Jaccard) hierarchical dissimilarity clusters. Figure S8. – Hypersaline lake viruses methyltransferase phylogenetic (UniFrac) and taxonomic (Jaccard) hierarchical dissimilarity clusters. Figure S9. – Hypersaline lake viruses concanavalin A-like glucanases/lectins phylogenetic (UniFrac) and taxonomic (Jaccard) hierarchical dissimilarity clusters. Figure S10. – Subsurface bacteria phylogenetic (UniFrac) and taxonomic (Jaccard) hierarchical dissimilarity clusters. Figure S11. – Substrate-associated soil fungi phylogenetic (UniFrac) and taxonomic (Jaccard) hierarchical dissimilarity clusters.

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