Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Genomics and BioMed Central.

Open Access Research article

Global comparative analysis of ESTs from the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

Minghua Wang1, Felix D Guerrero2*, Geo Pertea3 and Vishvanath M Nene3

Author Affiliations

1 Lorus Therapeutics Inc; 2 Meridian Road, Toronto, ON M9W 4Z7, Canada

2 USDA-ARS, Knipling Bushland U.S. Livestock Insect Research Laboratory; 2700 Fredericksburg Rd., Kerrville, TX 78028, USA

3 The J. Craig Venter Institute, 9712 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Genomics 2007, 8:368  doi:10.1186/1471-2164-8-368

Published: 12 October 2007

Abstract

Background

The southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, is an economically important parasite of cattle and can transmit several pathogenic microorganisms to its cattle host during the feeding process. Understanding the biology and genomics of R. microplus is critical to developing novel methods for controlling these ticks.

Results

We present a global comparative genomic analysis of a gene index of R. microplus comprised of 13,643 unique transcripts assembled from 42,512 expressed sequence tags (ESTs), a significant fraction of the complement of R. microplus genes. The source material for these ESTs consisted of polyA RNA from various tissues, lifestages, and strains of R. microplus, including larvae exposed to heat, cold, host odor, and acaricide. Functional annotation using RPS-Blast analysis identified conserved protein domains in the conceptually translated gene index and assigned GO terms to those database transcripts which had informative BlastX hits. Blast Score Ratio and SimiTri analysis compared the conceptual transcriptome of the R. microplus database to other eukaryotic proteomes and EST databases, including those from 3 ticks. The most abundant protein domains in BmiGI were also analyzed by SimiTri methodology.

Conclusion

These results indicate that a large fraction of BmiGI entries have no homologs in other sequenced genomes. Analysis with the PartiGene annotation pipeline showed 64% of the members of BmiGI could not be assigned GO annotation, thus minimal information is available about a significant fraction of the tick genome. This highlights the important insights in tick biology which are likely to result from a tick genome sequencing project. Global comparative analysis identified some tick genes with unexpected phylogenetic relationships which detailed analysis attributed to gene losses in some members of the animal kingdom. Some tick genes were identified which had close orthologues to mammalian genes. Members of this group would likely be poor choices as targets for development of novel tick control technology.