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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Re-annotation and re-analysis of the Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 genome sequence

Ozan Gundogdu1, Stephen D Bentley2, Matt T Holden2, Julian Parkhill2, Nick Dorrell1 and Brendan W Wren1*

Author Affiliations

1 Pathogen Molecular Department, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, UK

2 Pathogen Sequencing Unit, Sanger Institute, UK

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BMC Genomics 2007, 8:162  doi:10.1186/1471-2164-8-162

Published: 12 June 2007

Abstract

Background

Campylobacter jejuni is the leading bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis in the developed world. To improve our understanding of this important human pathogen, the C. jejuni NCTC11168 genome was sequenced and published in 2000. The original annotation was a milestone in Campylobacter research, but is outdated. We now describe the complete re-annotation and re-analysis of the C. jejuni NCTC11168 genome using current database information, novel tools and annotation techniques not used during the original annotation.

Results

Re-annotation was carried out using sequence database searches such as FASTA, along with programs such as TMHMM for additional support. The re-annotation also utilises sequence data from additional Campylobacter strains and species not available during the original annotation. Re-annotation was accompanied by a full literature search that was incorporated into the updated EMBL file [EMBL: AL111168]. The C. jejuni NCTC11168 re-annotation reduced the total number of coding sequences from 1654 to 1643, of which 90.0% have additional information regarding the identification of new motifs and/or relevant literature. Re-annotation has led to 18.2% of coding sequence product functions being revised.

Conclusions

Major updates were made to genes involved in the biosynthesis of important surface structures such as lipooligosaccharide, capsule and both O- and N-linked glycosylation. This re-annotation will be a key resource for Campylobacter research and will also provide a prototype for the re-annotation and re-interpretation of other bacterial genomes.