Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Determination of the melon chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences reveals that the largest reported mitochondrial genome in plants contains a significant amount of DNA having a nuclear origin

Luis Rodríguez-Moreno1, Víctor M González2, Andrej Benjak3, M Carmen Martí1, Pere Puigdomènech2, Miguel A Aranda1 and Jordi Garcia-Mas3*

Author Affiliations

1 Departamento de Biología del Estrés y Patología Vegetal, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura (CEBAS)-CSIC, 30100 Espinardo (Murcia), Spain

2 Department of Molecular Genetics, Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics CSIC-IRTA-UAB, UAB Campus, Edifici CRAG, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain

3 IRTA, Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics CSIC-IRTA-UAB, Campus UAB, Edifici CRAG, 08193 Bellaterra, (Barcelona), Spain

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BMC Genomics 2011, 12:424  doi:10.1186/1471-2164-12-424

Published: 20 August 2011

Additional files

Additional file 1:

Table S1. Protein homologies between C. melo and other plant chloroplast genomes.

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Additional file 2:

Table S2. Protein homologies between C. melo and other plant mitochondrial genomes.

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Additional file 3:

Figure S1. Syntenic relationships between the mitochondrial genomes of Cucumis melo, Citrullus lanatus and Cucurbita pepo. Only the protein coding regions have been used for this analysis. Intronless genes are depicted as orange vertical lines. Individual colours are used for the exons of each gene with introns.

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Additional file 4:

Table S3. Metrics of the Cucumis melo mitondrial genome assembly.

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