Figure 4.

Plot of the observed and expected P(ID) values of six loci on different population scenarios with different proportions of related individuals. The greater the number of siblings in the population, the higher is the average probability of identity and therefore the higher will be the number of loci required to distinguish individuals. The relationship proportions are numbered as: 1 = all unrelated animals; 2 = 0.1 siblings, 0.2 parents, 0.5 half siblings; 3 = 0.2 siblings, 0.2 unrelated, 0.2 parents, 0.4 half-siblings, 0.2 unrelated; 4 = 0.3 siblings, 0.2 parents, 0.3 half siblings, 0.2 unrelated; 5 = 0.5 siblings, 0.2 parents, 0.1 half-siblings, 0.2 unrelated; 6 = 0.6 siblings, 0.2 parents, 0 half-siblings, 0.2 unrelated; 7 = 0.7 siblings, 0.2 parents, 0 half-siblings, 0.1 unrelated; 8 = 0.8 siblings, 0.2 parents, 0 siblings, 0 unrelated; 9 = 0.9 siblings, 0.1 parents, 0 unrelated; 10 = 1.0 siblings.

Bhagavatula and Singh BMC Genetics 2006 7:48   doi:10.1186/1471-2156-7-48
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