Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

Daniel Ocampo Daza1*, Görel Sundström12, Christina A Bergqvist1 and Dan Larhammar1

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Neuroscience, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala Universitet, Box 593, SE-75124, Uppsala, Sweden

2 Present address: Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala Universitet, Box 582, SE-75123, Uppsala, Sweden

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BMC Evolutionary Biology 2012, 12:231  doi:10.1186/1471-2148-12-231

Published: 29 November 2012

Additional files

Additional file 1:

Supplemental notes 1–3. Detailed descriptions of the results, including the identification of SSTR sequences in genome databases as well as the phylogenetic analyses of neighboring gene families.

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Additional file 2:

Figures S1–S3. All phylogenetic analyses of the SSTR gene family.

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Additional file 3:

Table S4. Positional data for the SSTR1, -4 and -6-bearing chromosome regions. The members of the identified neighboring gene families in these chromosome regions are charted by species and chromosome/genomic scaffold. These charts show the identified paralogous chromosome regions in the human, chicken, medaka, stickleback and zebrafish genomes. Each species is included in a separate tab in the spreadsheet.

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Additional file 4:

Table S5. Positional data for the SSTR2, -3 and -5-bearing chromosome regions. The members of the identified neighboring gene families in these chromosome regions are charted by species and chromosome/genomic scaffold. These charts show the identified paralogous chromosome regions in the human, chicken, medaka, stickleback and zebrafish genomes. Each species is included in a separate tab in the spreadsheet.

Format: XLSX Size: 116KB Download file

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Additional file 5:

Figures S4–S20. Phylogenetic trees of the SSTR1, -4 and -6-neighboring gene families. Figures are numbered S4-S20 and include both neighbor joining and phylogenetic maximum likelihood trees of the gene families described in Table 2.

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Additional file 6:

Figures S21–S50. Phylogenetic trees of the SSTR2, -3 and -5-neighboring gene families. Figures are numbered S21-S50 and include both neighbor joining and phylogenetic maximum likelihood trees of the gene families described in Table 3.

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Additional file 7:

Table S1. Database identifiers, location data and annotation notes of all SSTR sequences identified and included in this study.

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Additional file 8:

Table S2. Database identifiers, location data and annotation notes of SSTR1,-4 and -6-neighboring gene family sequences, including information for those gene families that were discarded from the analysis. Each gene family is included in a separate tab in the spreadsheet.

Format: XLSX Size: 54KB Download file

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Additional file 9:

Table S3. Database identifiers, location data and annotation notes of SSTR2,-3 and -5-neighboring gene family sequences, including information for those gene families that were discarded from the analysis. Each gene family is included in a separate tab in the spreadsheet.

Format: XLSX Size: 135KB Download file

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