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Open Access Research article

Does body posture influence hand preference in an ancestral primate model?

Marina Scheumann1*, Marine Joly-Radko1, Lisette Leliveld1 and Elke Zimmermann12

Author Affiliations

1 Institute of Zoology, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Bünteweg 17, D-30559 Hannover, Germany

2 Center for Systems Neuroscience, Bünteweg 17, D-30559 Hannover, Germany

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BMC Evolutionary Biology 2011, 11:52  doi:10.1186/1471-2148-11-52

Published: 28 February 2011

Additional files

Additional file 1:

Movie SGT. Example of an experimental trial of the simple food grasping task (SGT).

Format: MPEG Size: 17.8MB Download file

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Open Data

Additional file 2:

Movie FGT-sit. Example of an experimental trial of the FGT-sit task.

Format: MPEG Size: 17.7MB Download file

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Additional file 3:

Movie FGT-biped. Example of an experimental trial of the FGT-biped task.

Format: MPEG Size: 17.6MB Download file

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Additional file 4:

Movie FGT-cling. Example of an experimental trial of the FGT-cling task.

Format: MPEG Size: 18.1MB Download file

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Additional file 5:

Movie FGT-triped. Example of an experimental trial of the FGT-triped task.

Format: MPEG Size: 17.7MB Download file

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Additional file 6:

Table HI. Handedness index (HI) and handedness bias (bias) for each subject and for each postural task; R - right-handed; L - left-handed; A - ambiguous; m - males, f-females; bold subjects showed consistent hand preference for all four postural tasks; data for the FGT-sit task were already published in 1 [34], 2 [35], from this data the first three sessions were selected to keep the number of sessions constant through the study.

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