Figure 1.

Insulin accelerates wound healing and improves the quality of re-epithelialization. Excision wounds were performed in C57BL/6J mice, and the healing process was monitored at different time points. (A) Representative images of wounds which were treated with vehicle (30 μl saline solution) or 0.03 u insulin/30 μl saline solution every two days. (B) Wound area was quantified every two days and expressed as the percentage of the original wound area (n = 9; Statistics are shown as comparisons between the treatment and control. *P < 0.05). Insulin significantly decreased wound area. (C, D) The length of the migrating tongues was determined by measuring the distance from the margin of the wound to the tip of the migrating keratinocytes at 40× magnification, in which one unit equals 25 μm. (C) Representative hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections showing longer migrating tongue in insulin treated wounds. Scale bars indicate 50 μm. (D) Data are shown as the mean value +/- SD. Statistics are shown as comparisons between the treatment and control (n = 9). *P < 0.05. (E) Representative hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections showing increased number of epidermal reticular ridges and dermal papilla in insulin treated healed wounds.

Liu et al. BMC Cell Biology 2009 10:1   doi:10.1186/1471-2121-10-1
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