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Open Access Research article

HemeBIND: a novel method for heme binding residue prediction by combining structural and sequence information

Rong Liu and Jianjun Hu*

Author Affiliations

Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA

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BMC Bioinformatics 2011, 12:207  doi:10.1186/1471-2105-12-207

Published: 26 May 2011

Abstract

Background

Accurate prediction of binding residues involved in the interactions between proteins and small ligands is one of the major challenges in structural bioinformatics. Heme is an essential and commonly used ligand that plays critical roles in electron transfer, catalysis, signal transduction and gene expression. Although much effort has been devoted to the development of various generic algorithms for ligand binding site prediction over the last decade, no algorithm has been specifically designed to complement experimental techniques for identification of heme binding residues. Consequently, an urgent need is to develop a computational method for recognizing these important residues.

Results

Here we introduced an efficient algorithm HemeBIND for predicting heme binding residues by integrating structural and sequence information. We systematically investigated the characteristics of binding interfaces based on a non-redundant dataset of heme-protein complexes. It was found that several sequence and structural attributes such as evolutionary conservation, solvent accessibility, depth and protrusion clearly illustrate the differences between heme binding and non-binding residues. These features can then be separately used or combined to build the structure-based classifiers using support vector machine (SVM). The results showed that the information contained in these features is largely complementary and their combination achieved the best performance. To further improve the performance, an attempt has been made to develop a post-processing procedure to reduce the number of false positives. In addition, we built a sequence-based classifier based on SVM and sequence profile as an alternative when only sequence information can be used. Finally, we employed a voting method to combine the outputs of structure-based and sequence-based classifiers, which demonstrated remarkably better performance than the individual classifier alone.

Conclusions

HemeBIND is the first specialized algorithm used to predict binding residues in protein structures for heme ligands. Extensive experiments indicated that both the structure-based and sequence-based methods have effectively identified heme binding residues while the complementary relationship between them can result in a significant improvement in prediction performance. The value of our method is highlighted through the development of HemeBIND web server that is freely accessible at http://mleg.cse.sc.edu/hemeBIND/ webcite.