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Zoonoses and emerging pathogens

Guest Editors:
Katarzyna Grudlewska-Buda: Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland
Faham Khamesipour: Research Center for Hydatid Disease in Iran, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
Krzysztof Skowron: Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland



Zoonoses are infectious diseases that are naturally transmissible from vertebrate animals to humans. They comprise many newly identified infectious diseases as well as existing ones. With over 200 known types of zoonoses, zoonotic pathogens may be bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic, or may involve unconventional agents. Zoonotic diseases can spread to humans through direct contact or through food, water or the environment, and pose major risks to human health, welfare, productivity and economy. Moreover, the number of zoonotic diseases is increasing due to socio-economic and ecological changes. In line with the One Health approach, which aims ‘to balance and optimize the health of people, animals and the environment’ (World Health Organization), BMC Microbiology has launched the collection `Zoonoses and emerging pathogens. This collection comprises original research on zoonoses and emerging pathogens that cover but are not limited to, their pathogenesis, pathogen-host interactions, detection, diagnosis, treatment, and control/prevention.

Meet the Guest Editors

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Katarzyna Grudlewska-Buda: Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland

Dr. Katarzyna Grudlewska-Buda has worked at the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz of the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń since 2016. In 2020, she obtained the degree of doctor of medical sciences in the specialty of medical biology. Her main research interests are genetic similarity of microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen and from the environment, and the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, especially Enterococcus spp. and Listeria monocytogenes. Dr. Katarzyna Grudlewska-Buda is the author of 56 full-text publications and 5 chapters in monographs.

Faham Khamesipour: Research Center for Hydatid Disease in Iran, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

Dr. Faham Khamesipour has a Ph.D. in Parasitology from Shiraz University with interests in zoonotic diseases, infectious diseases, parasitology, veterinary, health policy, medicinal plants, and medical education. After his Ph.D., he worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Tehran University of Medical Sciences and the Kerman University of Medical Sciences. He is also associated with the Shahrekord Branch, Islamic Azad University, Iran, as a Researcher and Professor. As an active researcher, he has about 130 publications, including research articles, review articles, and book chapters for scientific journals and books. He is also the editor of 10 books published.  Dr. Khamesipour serves as an editorial board member for BMC Microbiology and other prestigious journals. He has received over 14 awards and participated to 10 workshops, training courses, and 20 conferences. He is the head and scientific secretary of the First National Congress on Zoonoses in Iran.

Krzysztof Skowron: Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland

Dr. hab. eng. Krzysztof Skowron, Prof. NCU has worked at the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz of the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń since 2011. In 2019, he obtained the degree of habilitated doctor of medical sciences in the specialty of medical biology. He is currently employed as a Associate Professor. The ​​scientific interests of Dr. Skowron include the antimicrobial activities that can be implemented in hospitals and other health care units, as well as in food processing plants and animal farms. Moreover, Dr. Skowron investigates the phenotypic and genotypic properties of microbial strains, assessing the impact of antimicrobial activities on these properties and taking into account health protection. Particular attention is paid to the assessment of biofilm formation by the tested bacteria, its resistance to antimicrobial activity and the intensity of formation of this structure depending on environmental factors. He is also interested in emerging pathogens, zoonotic pathogens and the transmission of microorganisms between animals and humans. Dr. Skowron is the author of 103 publications and 6 chapters in monographs.

About the collection

Zoonoses are infectious diseases that are naturally transmissible from vertebrate animals to humans. They comprise many newly identified infectious diseases as well as existing ones. With over 200 known types of zoonoses, zoonotic pathogens may be bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic, or may involve unconventional agents. Zoonotic diseases can spread to humans through direct contact or through food, water or the environment, and pose major risks to human health, welfare, productivity and economy. Moreover, the number of zoonotic diseases is increasing due to socio-economic and ecological changes. In line with the One Health approach, which aims ‘to balance and optimize the health of people, animals and the environment’ (World Health Organization), BMC Microbiology  launched the collection `Zoonoses and emerging pathogen´. This collection comprises original research and latest updates on zoonoses and emerging pathogens that cover but are not limited to, their pathogenesis, pathogen-host interactions, detection, diagnosis, treatment, and control/prevention.

We considered submissions exploring the following areas of research:

•    Viral, parasitic, bacterial and fungal etiological agents of zoonotic diseases
•    Zoonoses and public health
•    Transmission routes of pathogens responsible for zoonotic diseases
•    Emerging and re-emerging pathogens in humans and animals
•    Zoonoses and antibiotic resistance in veterinary and human medicine
•    One Health approach
•    Outbreaks, epidemics, and pandemics caused by zoonoses
•    Socioeconomic and health disarray of zoonotic infections
•    Effects of climate change on zoonotic infections
•    Effects of social inequities on zoonotic prevalence and response

Image Credit: © dottedyeti / stock.adobe.com

  1. Leishmaniasis as a neglected tropical disease (NTD) is caused by the inoculation of Leishmania parasites via the bite of phlebotomine sand flies. After an infected bite, a series of innate and adaptive immune res...

    Authors: Fahimeh Firouzjaie, Niloofar Taghipour, Amir Ahmad Akhavan, Seyyed Javad Seyyed Tabaei, Soheila Rouhani, Maryam Shirazian, Ameneh Koochaki, Mahboubeh Fatemi, Nariman Mosaffa and Vahideh Moin Vaziri
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2024 24:117
  2. Cryptosporidium is a highly pathogenic parasite responsible for diarrhea in children worldwide. Here, the epidemiological status and genetic characteristics of Cryptosporidium in children with or without diarrhea...

    Authors: Wei Zhao, Guangxu Ren, Weiyan Jiang, Long Wang, Jiayang Wang, Zhongying Yuan, Lanzhu Yan, Yongtai Li, Yanbin Sun, Xinjie Xue, Yanyan Jiang, Gang Lu and Huicong Huang
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2024 24:113
  3. Psittacosis is a zoonosis caused by Chlamydia psittaci, the clinical manifestations of Psittacosis range from mild illness to fulminant severe pneumonia with multiple organ failure. This study aimed to evaluate t...

    Authors: Lei Yuan, Qiang Chen, Xin Yu Zhu, Lan Min Lai, Rui Zhao and Yang Liu
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2024 24:86
  4. Aeromonas dhakensis (A. dhakensis) is becoming an emerging pathogen worldwide, with an increasingly significant role in animals and human health. It is a ubiquitous bacteria found in terrestrial and aquatic milie...

    Authors: Chenxu Zhao, Panpan Qin, Shuai Li, Zilu Chen, Tianliang Wang, Qunchao Liang, Weishi He, Zeyu Peng, Yurong Yang, Zhifeng Peng and Yongtao Li
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2024 24:76
  5. Bacillus cereus is implicated in severe foodborne infection in humans. This study intended to assess the occurrence, groEL gene sequencing, biofilm production, and resistance profiles of emerged multidrug resista...

    Authors: Abdelazeem M. Algammal, Hamza M. Eid, Saad Alghamdi, Hanaa Ghabban, Roba Alatawy, Enas A. Almanzalawi, Tahani M. Alqahtani, Sabreen G. Elfouly, Gihan M. Mohammed, Helal F. Hetta and Reham M. El-Tarabili
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2024 24:50
  6. Filarial worms are important vector-borne pathogens of a large range of animal hosts, including humans, and are responsible for numerous debilitating neglected tropical diseases such as, lymphatic filariasis c...

    Authors: Lucas G. Huggins, Ushani Atapattu, Neil D. Young, Rebecca J. Traub and Vito Colella
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2024 24:28
  7. A molecular surveillance of tick-borne diseases was performed in Hulunbuir City, Inner Mongolia. A total of 149 ticks including three species (Ixodes persulcatus, Haemaphysalis concinna, and Dermacentor silvarum)...

    Authors: Junhua Tian, Jing Liu, Hongqing Zhao, Xiaomin Chen, Xueqin Geng, Miao Lu and Kun Li
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2023 23:359
  8. Staphylococcus aureus is part of normal flora and also an opportunistic pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections in both humans and animals. Livestock-associated S. aureus (LA-SA) has gained importance...

    Authors: Relangi Tulasi Rao, Vinoth Madhavan, Pavitra Kumar, Gnanaraj Muniraj, Natesan Sivakumar and Jayakumar Kannan
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2023 23:326
  9. Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an intracellular obligate parasite that causes granulocytic anaplasmosis. Effector Ats-1 is an important virulence factor of A. phagocytophilum. Multiomics screening and validation ha...

    Authors: Ruirui Li, Zhongchen Ma, Wei Zheng, Yangyang Xiao, Zhen Wang, Jihai Yi, Yong Wang and Chuangfu Chen
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2023 23:271
  10. Listeria monocytogenes are Gram-positive rods, widespread in the environment due to their wide tolerance to changing conditions. The apilot study aimed to assess the impact of six various stresses (heat, cold, os...

    Authors: Natalia Wiktorczyk-Kapischke, Ewa Wałecka-Zacharska, Jakub Korkus, Katarzyna Grudlewska-Buda, Anna Budzyńska, Kacper Wnuk, Eugenia Gospodarek-Komkowska and Krzysztof Skowron
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2023 23:259
  11. Zoonotic diseases pose a significant threat to public health. Chlamydia, as an intracellular pathogen, can colonize the intestinal tract of humans and animals, changing the gut microbiota. However, only a few stu...

    Authors: Youshun Jin, Wei Li, Xuli Ba, Yunhui Li, Yanyan Wang, Huaiyu Zhang, Zhaocai Li and Jizhang Zhou
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2023 23:246
  12. Staphylococcus aureus can infect and adapt to multiple host species. However, our understanding of the genetic and evolutionary drivers of its generalist lifestyle remains inadequate. This is particularly importa...

    Authors: Stephanie S. R. Souza, Joshua T. Smith, Spencer A. Bruce, Robert Gibson, Isabella W. Martin and Cheryl P. Andam
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2023 23:235
  13. Zoonoses represent a major challenge for many disciplines, including microbiology, epidemiology, veterinary, medicine and ecology. Moreover, they pose severe risks to human health and economy. In this editoria...

    Authors: Krzysztof Skowron, Katarzyna Grudlewska-Buda and Faham Khamesipour
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2023 23:232
  14. This study was aimed to evaluate the prevalence and molecular characteristics of ciprofloxacin resistance among 346 Escherichia coli isolates collected from clinical specimens (n = 82), healthy children (n = 176)...

    Authors: Zohreh Neyestani, Farzad Khademi, Roghayeh Teimourpour, Mojtaba Amani and Mohsen Arzanlou
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2023 23:191
  15. Salmonellosis, a zoonotic disease, is one of the leading causes of foodborne illness worldwide. It is responsible for most infections caused by consumption of contaminated food. In recent years, a significant ...

    Authors: Marziye Nazari Moghadam, Ebrahim Rahimi, Amir Shakerian and Hassan Momtaz
    Citation: BMC Microbiology 2023 23:168