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Call for papers - Weight stigma in pregnancy and postpartum

Guest Editors:
Sara Holton: School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia
Linda Sweet: School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia

Submission Status: Open   |   Submission Deadline: 30 April 2024
 

BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth is calling for submissions to our Collection on Weight stigma in pregnancy and postpartum.

Weight stigma is discrimination based on bias against individuals who are seen as being above or below an ‘ideal’ weight. In healthcare settings, weight stigma can lead to delayed care, misdiagnosis, and poor patient-provider relationships.  In pregnancy care, concerns with adequate vs. excessive weight gain can further exacerbate negative experiences of pregnant individuals who have previously experienced weight stigma or are experiencing excessive or inadequate weight gain, while pressure to “lose the baby weight” soon after birth can exacerbate the difficulties of the postpartum period.  Women’s exposure to weight stigma during and after pregnancy can affect their mental health, their attitudes toward food and physical activity, and their healthcare seeking behaviors.  This can lead to poorer maternal and neonatal outcomes including excessive or inadequate gestational weight gain, preterm birth, neonatal morbidity, and perinatal mood and anxiety disorders.


New Content ItemThis collection supports and amplifies research related to SDG 3: Good Health & Well-Being, and SDG 5: Gender Equality.

Meet the Guest Editors

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Sara Holton: School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia

Dr. Sara Holton is a mid‐career researcher and social scientist who conducts psychosocial research in three main, often intersecting, areas: women’s health, mental health and wellbeing, and health services research. Dr Holton has a particular research interest in women’s reproductive health including women’s psychosocial wellbeing and weight management during their childbearing years.


Linda Sweet: School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia

Professor Sweet is a nurse and midwife and the inaugural Chair of Midwifery at the Deakin University and Western Health Partnership, Melbourne, Australia. She is particularly interested in breastfeeding and lactation research, obesity and its impact on pregnant women, midwifery practice, and enhancing maternal health. She has researched vulnerable groups about care coordination, empowerment, and breastfeeding support, and has a program of research around supporting breastfeeding in vulnerable groups and around the care of pregnant women with obesity.

About the Collection

BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth is calling for submissions to our Collection on Weight stigma in pregnancy and postpartum.

Weight stigma is discrimination based on bias against individuals who are seen as being above or below an ‘ideal’ weight. In healthcare settings, weight stigma can lead to delayed care, misdiagnosis, and poor patient-provider relationships.  In pregnancy care, concerns with adequate vs. excessive weight gain can further exacerbate negative experiences of pregnant individuals who have previously experienced weight stigma or are experiencing excessive or inadequate weight gain, while pressure to “lose the baby weight” soon after birth can exacerbate the difficulties of the postpartum period.  Women’s exposure to weight stigma during and after pregnancy can affect their mental health, their attitudes toward food and physical activity, and their healthcare seeking behaviors.  This can lead to poorer maternal and neonatal outcomes including excessive or inadequate gestational weight gain, preterm birth, neonatal morbidity, and perinatal mood and anxiety disorders.

BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth is launching a new Collection, ‘Weight stigma in pregnancy and postpartum,’ to bring together research about the effects of weight stigma and weight bias on currently and recently pregnant individuals, as well as effective strategies to prevent and mitigate it.  Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, gestational weight gain, obesity, postpartum weight loss, mental health, healthcare provider bias, missed or delayed diagnoses, pregnancy outcomes, and the role of healthcare providers in perpetuating or mitigating weight stigma during and after pregnancy.  The Collection welcomes quantitative and qualitative research from around the globe addressing weight stigma in pregnancy and postpartum.

This Collection aligns with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly SDG 3: Good Health & Well-Being, and SDG 5: Gender Equality. Weight stigma in pregnancy and postpartum is a public health issue that requires a person-centered gender-sensitive approach to ensure that all women have equitable access to quality healthcare services and support during pregnancy and beyond.

Image credit: Andrey Popov / Stock.adobe.com

  1. Individuals with an increased body mass index (BMI) (≥ 30 kg/m2) experience higher rates of perinatal mental health disorders than individuals with BMI < 30. Personal experience of decreased control over labor ha...

    Authors: Anna R. Whelan, Brock E. Polnaszek, Olivia Recabo, Melissa A. Clark, Adam K. Lewkowitz and Nina K. Ayala
    Citation: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2023 23:752

Submission Guidelines

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This Collection welcomes submission of original Research Articles. Should you wish to submit a different article type, please read our submission guidelines to confirm that type is accepted by the journal. Articles for this Collection should be submitted via our submission system, Snapp. During the submission process you will be asked whether you are submitting to a Collection, please select "Weight stigma in pregnancy and postpartum" from the dropdown menu.

Articles will undergo the journal’s standard peer-review process and are subject to all of the journal’s standard policies. Articles will be added to the Collection as they are published.

The Editors have no competing interests with the submissions which they handle through the peer review process. The peer review of any submissions for which the Editors have competing interests is handled by another Editorial Board Member who has no competing interests.