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Resilience in Dementia

Resilience in Dementia

Brain resilience is the process of adapting well in the face of significant sources of stress, such as Alzheimer’s disease pathology, other neurodegenerative conditions or biological aging. This thematic series entitled “Resilience in dementia” comprises nine articles covering a wide range of topics, including concepts related to resilience (e.g. brain reserve, cognitive reserve and brain maintenance), its underlying mechanisms (e.g. left frontal cortex functional connectivity) and consequences for disease trajectories (e.g. rates of progression to dementia). The contributions span from perspective papers to strictly data-driven articles and range from cell/animal models, to cognitively normal individuals to clinical populations. Altogether, this thematic series provides a comprehensive overview of what factors contribute to brain resilience and how this affects brain health and cognitive function.

Guest ​​​​​​​Editor: Rik Ossenkoppele

Published: Ongoing

  1. Content type: Research

    We explored the presence of both reserve and resilience in late-converter mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease (MCI-AD) and in patients with slowly progressing amyloid-positive MCI by assessing...

    Authors: Matteo Bauckneht, Andrea Chincarini, Roberta Piva, Dario Arnaldi, Nicola Girtler, Federico Massa, Matteo Pardini, Matteo Grazzini, Hulya Efeturk, Marco Pagani, Gianmario Sambuceti, Flavio Nobili and Silvia Morbelli

    Citation: Alzheimer's Research & Therapy 2018 10:35

    Published on:

  2. Content type: Research

    Recent evidence derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies suggests that functional hubs (i.e., highly connected brain regions) are important for mental health. We found recently that gl...

    Authors: Nicolai Franzmeier, Julia Hartmann, Alexander N. W. Taylor, Miguel Á. Araque-Caballero, Lee Simon-Vermot, Lana Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Katharina Bürger, Cihan Catak, Daniel Janowitz, Claudia Müller, Birgit Ertl-Wagner, Robert Stahl, Martin Dichgans, Marco Duering and Michael Ewers

    Citation: Alzheimer's Research & Therapy 2018 10:28

    Published on: