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Call for papers - Public health literacy

Guest Editors

Julie Ayre, PhD, The University of Sydney, Australia
Enrique Castro-Sánchez, PhD, Brunel University London, UK
Peter Kolarčik, PhD, P.J. Safarik University in Kosice, Slovakia

Submission Status: Open   |   Submission Deadline: 5 August 2024
 

BMC Public Health is calling for submissions to our Collection on Public health literacy. Limited personal health literacy is a predictor of poor health behaviors such as poor diet, smoking and lack of physical activity, and poor health outcomes such as increased risk of hospitalization and premature mortality in the population. There is a need for interventions to improve health literacy that can lead to positive changes in health behaviors, potentially reducing health inequalities. We welcome submissions addressing but not limited to: community-based interventions to improve and promote health literacy policy, (cost-)effectiveness of interventions in influencing health behaviors, population health literacy assessment, the relationship between personal health literacy skills and the health environment, links with chronic diseases, strategies to reduce health inequalities, effect of reducing health inequalities towards improving health literacy.

New Content ItemThis Collection supports and amplifies research related to SDG 3: Good Health & Well-Being, SDG 1: No Poverty, SDG 2: Zero Hunger and SDG 10: Reduced Inequalities.

Meet the Guest Editors

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Julie Ayre, PhD, The University of Sydney, Australia

Dr Julie Ayre is a 2023 NHMRC Emerging Leader Research Fellow based at the Sydney Health Literacy Lab, within the Sydney School of Public Health at the University of Sydney. Dr Ayre sits on the scientific advisory team that is developing a National Health Literacy Strategy on behalf of the Australian Government Department of Health. Her research has focused on health literacy, digital health, and behaviour change across varied health conditions (e.g. diabetes, low back pain, COVID-19). She led development of the Sydney Health Literacy Lab’s Health Literacy Editor, an online text-editing tool that helps health information providers develop easy-to-read health information, and led Australia’s largest multi-language survey capturing COVID-19 knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours.

Enrique Castro-Sánchez, PhD, Brunel University London, UK            

Dr Enrique Castro-Sánchez is Senior Lecturer in Planetary Health at the Global Challenges programme at Brunel University London (UK), a position he combines with an honorary lectureship in infection at Imperial College London (UK), and visiting posts at University of Balearic Islands (Spain), and Shifa University (Pakistan). His research interests include health literacy in infectious diseases and healthcare-associated infections; the impact of health inequalities on infectious diseases; policy influence on management of infectious diseases; use of social networks on clinicians and patients’ attitudes to infection; and the implementation and evaluation of new roles for nurses. Dr Castro-Sánchez holds editorial positions in BMC Public Health, and BMC Health Services Research, among others.

Peter Kolarčik, PhD, P.J. Safarik University in Kosice, Slovakia                                            

Dr Peter Kolarčik is a senior researcher at the Department of Health Psychology and Research Methodology in the Faculty of Medicine P.J. Safarik University in Kosice, Slovakia. His research focuses on utilisation of patients’ health literacy in management of chronic patients and their quality of life. Additionally he is involved in Slovak national and International research team of Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) WHO collaborative cross-national study of adolescent health and well-being. He is particularly interested in methodological and analytical procedures, ensuring a deep understanding of research data for practical applications, improving patient quality of life and enhancing healthcare practices.


About the Collection

BMC Public Health is calling for submissions to our Collection on Public health literacy.

Health literacy reflects both the complexity of the health environment, and the personal skills of individuals and communities. Limited personal health literacy is a predictor of poor health behaviors such as poor diet, smoking and lack of physical activity, and poor health outcomes such as increased risk of hospitalization and premature mortality in the population.

Poor environmental and personal health literacy can also result in lower uptake of health promotion services, such as health screening and vaccinations, and can make it more difficult for a person to follow medical instructions and healthcare plans.

Individuals with an adequate level of health literacy have the capacity to manage their own health and the conditions that affect their health on a day-to-day basis well, taking action to improve their lifestyle and living conditions, with a more efficient use of the health system and a resulting advantage for the whole community. 

There is a need for interventions to improve health literacy in populations. These interventions can promote changes in health behaviors and reduce health inequalities. Indeed, individuals in the society with limited health literacy have the poorest health outcomes. 

This  supports a number of Sustainable Development Goals including SDG 3: Good Health & Well-Being, SDG 1: No Poverty, SDG 2: Zero Hunger and SDG10: Reduced Inequalities. For this collection calling for research on public health literacy, BMC Public Health welcomes submissions addressing but not limited to:

  • Community-based interventions to improve and promote public health literacy 
  • Health literacy policy and frameworks
  • The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of health literacy interventions in influencing health behaviors
  • Population health literacy assessment
  • The relationship between personal health literacy skills and the health environment
  • The association between chronic disease and health literacy 
  • Optimal approaches to improving health literacy to reduce health inequalities, and effect of reducing health inequalities towards improving health literacy


Image credit: Photographee.eu / stock.adobe.com

There are currently no articles in this collection.

Submission Guidelines

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This Collection welcomes submission of original Research Articles. Should you wish to submit a different article type, please read our submission guidelines to confirm that type is accepted by the journal. Articles for this Collection should be submitted via our submission system, Snapp. During the submission process you will be asked whether you are submitting to a Collection, please select "Public health literacy" from the dropdown menu.

Articles will undergo the journal’s standard peer-review process and are subject to all of the journal’s standard policies. Articles will be added to the Collection as they are published.

The Editors have no competing interests with the submissions which they handle through the peer review process. The peer review of any submissions for which the Editors have competing interests is handled by another Editorial Board Member who has no competing interests.