Skip to main content

Call for papers - Optimizing opioid prescriptions in the emergency department

Guest Editors:
Ashraf A. Dahaba: Suez Canal University, Egypt
Rishi S. Nannan Panday: Amsterdam UMC, The Netherlands
 

Submission Status: Open   |   Submission Deadline: 31 July 2024 


To  discuss the core issues of opioid prescriptions in ED and invite the clinicians and researchers globally to contribute their latest discoveries and reflections to help advance our understanding of this important topic, we have decided to launch a new BMC Emergency Medicine collection, "Optimizing opioid prescriptions in the emergency department".

Meet the Guest Editors

Back to top

Ashraf A. Dahaba: Suez Canal University, Egypt

Ashraf A. Dahaba is an emeritus Professor of Anesthesiology at Suez Canal University, Egypt. He was former guest Professor at Medical University of Graz, Austria. Prof Dahaba is adjunct Professor at The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an and adjunct Professor at Zhe Jiang University, Hang Zhou, China. He is also consultant of Anesthesia at General Medical Council, United Kingdom. Prof Dahaba is the lead researcher and first author of 63 top impact factor publications in depth of anesthesia monitoring such as Bispectral Index (BIS) and different modalities of neuromuscular monitoring.
 

Rishi S. Nannan Panday: Amsterdam UMC, The Netherlands

Rishi Nannan Panday is a medical doctor and researcher. For his PhD in the field of acute internal medicine, he compared the effects of early prehospital antibiotic treatment for sepsis patients with usual care. After finishing his PhD, Dr Nannan Panday completed his training as a clinical pharmacologist. He continued his career in Singapore, where he worked as a project lead in the field of digital health at the Nanyang Technological University. Dr Nannan Panday is currently the medical director of Keuringarts B.V., The Netherlands.


About the collection

BMC Emergency Medicine is calling for submissions to our Collection on "Optimizing opioid prescriptions in the emergency department".

One of primary goals of emergency care is to alleviate severe pain due to acute or chronic condition safely and effectively, and opioid is still the main medication for treatment of severe pain. However, opioids are addictive, and patients may be at the risk of opioid use disorder even with a single prescription after an emergency department visit. While long-term use of opioid is associated with many adverse effects, including immunosuppression, neurohormonal defects, risk of addiction, respiratory depression  etc. At currently, there are many opioid prescription guidelines to ensure its proper use in Emergency Department.  However despite these guidelines, long-term opioid abuse is an increasing problem worldwide.  

To  discuss the core issues of opioid prescriptions in ED and invite the clinicians and researchers globally to contribute their latest discoveries and reflections to help advance our understanding of this important topic, we have decided to launch a new BMC Emergency Medicine collection “Optimizing opioid prescriptions in the emergency department”. 

We invite submissions from all aspects of this developing field including, but not limited to:

  • The causes and consequences of the opioid pandemic; 
  • Alternatives to opioids for the treatment of severe pain in the emergency department;
  • The aspects that make persons prone to opioid addiction;
  • Treatment of opioid addiction;
  • How to optimize opioid prescription without compromising patient wellbeing;
  • The role of doctors in the management of opioid addiction.

When submitting your work, please indicate in your cover letter that it is intended for the "Optimizing opioid prescriptions in the emergency department" collection. You can email your pre-submission queries to the Editor of BMC Emergency Medicine at guangde.tu@biomedcentral.com.

Image credit: BackyardProduction / Getty Images / iStock

  1. This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of intravenous ibuprofen or intravenous ibuprofen plus acetaminophen compared to intravenous morphine in patients with closed extremity fractures.

    Authors: Mehdi Nasr Isfahani, Hossein Etesami, Omid Ahmadi and Babak Masoumi
    Citation: BMC Emergency Medicine 2024 24:15

Submission Guidelines

Back to top

This Collection welcomes submission of research articles, database articles, software articles and study protocols. Before submitting your manuscript, please ensure you have read our submission guidelines. Articles for this Collection should be submitted via our submission system, Snapp. During the submission process you will be asked whether you are submitting to a Collection, please select ["Optimizing opioid prescriptions in the emergency department"] from the dropdown menu.

Articles will undergo the journal’s standard peer-review process and are subject to all of the journal’s standard policies. Articles will be added to the Collection as they are published.

The Guest Editors have no competing interests with the submissions which they handle through the peer review process. The peer review of any submissions for which the Guest Editors have competing interests is handled by another Editorial Board Member who has no competing interests.