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Call for papers - Monkeypox

Guest Editors:
Abdullah Reda: Al Azhar University, Egypt
Claude Sabeta: University of Pretoria, Republic of South Africa
Ranjit Sah: Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Nepal

Submission Status: Open   |   Submission Deadline: 29 March 2024


BMC Infectious Diseases is calling for submissions to our Collection on Monkeypox.

 This Collection aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of knowledge on the etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of monkeypox.

Due to its potential to cause outbreaks and the lack of specific treatment and prevention options, Monkeypox has become a significant public health concern. Understanding the transmission dynamics of the virus, identifying the risk factors for human infection, developing diagnostic tools, and exploring potential therapies and vaccines are critical areas of research.

Meet the Guest Editors

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Abdullah Reda: Al Azhar University, Egypt

Dr Abdullah Reda is a physician in the Faculty of Medicine at Al Azhar University. He is mainly interested in the epidemiology and clinical patterns of tropical and emerging infectious diseases, aiming at enhancing research in this area and promoting healthcare. Recently, he took part in multiple worldwide inaugurations and collaborations aiming at investigating and understanding the patterns and risk factors of the emerging infectious diseases and the related disease outbreaks.

Claude Sabeta: University of Pretoria, Republic of South Africa

Dr Claude Sabeta is an Associate Professor at the University of Pretoria and teaches Virology to both undergraduate and postgraduate students. He has been involved in training of regional rabies diagnosticians, coordinating proficiency tests and specific diagnostic test methods through partnerships with local and international collaborators. Dr Sabeta serves as an external collaborator on the OIE Pathogen Genomic Platform project.

Ranjit Sah: Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Nepal

Dr Ranjit Sah is a physician at the Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital. He is an infectious Diseases expert with research interests in emerging infectious diseases and viral infections. He takes care of infectious diseases patients in tertiary care hospitals and works as research coordinator at the National Public Health laboratory. He is an editorial board member editor and reviewer in several infectious diseases journal.

About the collection

BMC Infectious Diseases is calling for submissions to our Collection on Monkeypox.

 This Collection aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of knowledge on the etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of monkeypox.

Monkeypox is a zoonotic disease caused by the monkeypox virus, which belongs to the family Poxviridae. It is characterized by a febrile illness with a prodrome of headache, muscle aches, and fatigue, followed by the appearance of a rash that progresses to pustular lesions. The disease is generally self-limiting, but severe cases with complications can occur, particularly in immunocompromised individuals.

Due to its potential to cause outbreaks and the lack of specific treatment and prevention options, Monkeypox has become a significant public health concern. Understanding the transmission dynamics of the virus, identifying the risk factors for human infection, developing diagnostic tools, and exploring potential therapies and vaccines are critical areas of research.

Continuing to advance our collective understanding of monkeypox is crucial for several reasons. The virus has the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality in affected individuals, particularly in areas with limited healthcare resources. As the virus can be transmitted from animals to humans, understanding the ecology of the virus and its animal hosts can help prevent future outbreaks. Importantly, as the monkeypox virus shares genetic similarities with other orthopoxviruses, such as smallpox, understanding the disease could aid in the development of broad-spectrum vaccines and therapeutics.

The scope of this Collection includes but is not limited to:

  • The epidemiology and transmission dynamics of monkeypox
  • The molecular biology and pathogenesis of monkeypox virus
  • The clinical presentation and diagnosis of monkeypox
  • The management and treatment of monkeypox
  • The development of vaccines and immunotherapies against monkeypox
  • The effectiveness of vaccines and immunotherapies against monkeypox
  • The prevention and control of monkeypox outbreaks 
  • The diagnostic challenges in monkeypox virus detection
  • The comparative genomics of monkeypox and other orthopoxviruses


Image credit: © Brian W.J. Mahy

  1. The outbreak of mpox that occurred between 2022 and 2023 is primarily being transmitted through sexual contact. As of now, there is no consensus on the recommended duration of isolation to prevent sexual trans...

    Authors: Sung Un Shin, Younggon Jung, Seong Eun Kim and Dong Min Kim
    Citation: BMC Infectious Diseases 2024 24:183
  2. In the 2022 mpox-outbreak most patients presented with mild symptoms. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement has previously been described as a rare and severe complication of mpox; however, diagnostic findi...

    Authors: Hansen Karin, Båtshake Ylva, Söderholm Sandra, Pettke Aleksandra, Björkman Per and Sondén Klara
    Citation: BMC Infectious Diseases 2024 24:94
  3. Considering the rapidly spreading monkeypox outbreak, WHO has declared a global health emergency. Still in the category of being endemic, the monkeypox disease shares numerous clinical characters with smallpox...

    Authors: Tahir Munir, Maaz Khan, Salman Arif Cheema, Fiza Khan, Ayesha Usmani and Mohsin Nazir
    Citation: BMC Infectious Diseases 2024 24:16
  4. Human mpox has increasingly been reported worldwide since May 2022, with higher incidence in men who have sex with men (MSM) and persons living with HIV (PLHIV) with presentation typical for generalized macule...

    Authors: Syeda Sahra, Raul Orozco Villalobos, Brian M. Scott, Deidra J. Bowman, Joseph Sassine, Michelle Salvaggio, Douglas A. Drevets and Nelson Iván Agudelo Higuita
    Citation: BMC Infectious Diseases 2023 23:850
  5. The course of monkeypox can be severe. Our aim was to retrospectively compare the risk of hospital admission, the need for ventilation, sepsis, pneumonitis and death between the recent outbreak and historical ...

    Authors: Florian Gaertner, Saskia Preissner, William Arthur Petri Jr., Olubunmi Atolani, Max Heiland, Susanne Nahles, Robert Preissner and Moritz Hertel
    Citation: BMC Infectious Diseases 2023 23:610

Submission Guidelines

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This Collection welcomes submission of original Research Articles. Should you wish to submit a different article type, please read our submission guidelines to confirm that type is accepted by the journal. Articles for this Collection should be submitted via our submission system, Snapp. During the submission process you will be asked whether you are submitting to a Collection, please select "Monkeypox" from the dropdown menu.

Articles will undergo the journal’s standard peer-review process and are subject to all of the journal’s standard policies. Articles will be added to the Collection as they are published.

The Editors have no competing interests with the submissions which they handle through the peer review process. The peer review of any submissions for which the Editors have competing interests is handled by another Editorial Board Member who has no competing interests.