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Call for papers - Human-wildlife interaction

Guest Editors:
Edward Narayan: University of Queensland, Australia
Naureen Rana: University of Agriculture, Pakistan
 

This collection is no longer accepting submissions.


As human populations continuously expand into natural habitats of wild animals, interactions between humans and animals are becoming more common. Human impact on natural ecosystems have led to habitat loss and a decrease in biodiversity. On the other hand, wildlife damage to livestock and agricultural crops has led to loss of property and livelihood. Therefore, wildlife management and conservation efforts have been set in place to mitigate these conflicts.

Meet the Guest Editors

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Edward Narayan: University of Queensland, Australia

Dr. Edward Narayan specialises in comparative animal physiology, using biomarkers to evaluate the physiological responses of animals to environmental change. He currently teaches at The University of Queensland and leads the Stress Laboratory. Dr Narayan has published over 90 scientific papers and is widely cited in the fields of non-invasive endocrinology and conservation physiology research. 

Naureen Rana: University of Agriculture, Pakistan

Dr. Naureen Rana is an Assistant Professor at the University of Agriculture, Pakistan. Their research currently focuses on the diversity of arthropods, particularly insects in different agroecological zones. She is also interested in the monitoring of wildlife and their conservational aspects. She is interested in the conservation of insects and the ecological balance that insects impose on the ecosystem. She also has experience in agricultural entomology as well as studying different landscapes. In addition to this, they have documented the insects of different agricultural cropland of Punjab Pakistan.

About the collection

BMC Zoology welcomed for submissions to our Collection on Human-wildlife interaction.

As human populations continuously expand into natural habitats of wild animals, interactions between humans and animals are becoming more common. Human impact on natural ecosystems have led to habitat loss and a decrease in biodiversity. On the other hand, wildlife damage to livestock and agricultural crops has led to loss of property and livelihood. Therefore, wildlife management and conservation efforts have been set in place to mitigate these conflicts.

But this is just part of the story: the human impact on wildlife reaches far beyond destruction of habitats. Spillover diseases originating from factory farms have devastating effects on wild animal populations. The use of pesticides in agriculture has led to a drastic decline in pollinator populations, which again effects our own livelihood. Water and air pollution has hugely impacted wildlife worldwide and has led to a rapid decline in biodiversity.

Finding a way for humans and wildlife to co-exist creates opportunities to protect biodiversity and safeguard ecosystem health. These in turn support food security and new sustainable developments, which are essential for humans and wildlife alike. This special collection aims to collate original research and review articles regarding ‘Human-Wildlife interaction’. We are looking for research from laboratory and field studies on terrestrial and aquatic animals and ecosystems.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Wildlife damage and conflicts, wildlife management techniques, wildlife conservation 
  • Invasive species, endangered or threatened species
  • Nuisance and over-abundant wildlife
  • Urban wildlife
  • Human impact on wildlife through agriculture, factory farming, pesticides, deforestation, pollution
  • Zoonotic diseases 

Articles submitted after 31 December 2023 will not be eligible for inclusion in the collection.

Image Credit: A Chomolla/pexels

  1. Land use intensification may affect diversity, abundance, and functional morphological traits (FMT) related to dispersal, food acquisition, digestion, and nesting in some insects, possibly impacting their ecol...

    Authors: Luis Ricardo Salazar-Salazar and Olga Patricia Pinzón-Florian
    Citation: BMC Zoology 2023 8:24
  2. Human-wildlife interaction is a broad and complex topic. Due to rapid world population growth, there have been greater human impacts on wildlife through agriculture and land fragmentation. In many countries, s...

    Authors: Edward Narayan and Naureen Rana
    Citation: BMC Zoology 2023 8:5