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Critically Appraised Topics on Adverse Food Reactions

 Some of what is taught in veterinary dermatology is handed down from one practitioner to the other without critical appraisal of its scientific value. Bad tips and habits are picked up and are never corrected.  Royal Canin, founded in 1968, has remained at the cutting edge of veterinary science. They are strongly committed to fueling evidence-based medicine and improving effectiveness in veterinary practice. With the objective of reviewing existing knowledge and dogmas on adverse food reactions in dogs and cats, the available scientific evidence has been reviewed to produce a series of critically appraised topics (CAT), which will hopefully debunk some of the veterinary dermatology misconceptions surrounding food allergies. The article processing charges for papers in this series were funded by Royal Canin. Royal Canin had no involvement in the production of these papers. All articles in this series have undergone the journal’s standard peer-review process.

  1. Content type: Research article

    The gold standard to diagnose adverse food reactions (AFRs) in the dog and cat is currently an elimination diet with subsequent provocation trials. However, those trials are inconvenient and client compliance ...

    Authors: Ralf S. Mueller and Thierry Olivry

    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2017 13:275

    Published on:

  2. Content type: Research article

    The prevalence of cutaneous adverse food reactions (CAFRs) in dogs and cats is not precisely known. This imprecision is likely due to the various populations that had been studied. Our objectives were to syste...

    Authors: Thierry Olivry and Ralf S. Mueller

    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2017 13:51

    Published on:

  3. Content type: Research article

    To diagnose cutaneous adverse food reactions (CAFRs) in dogs and cats, dietary restriction-provocation trials are performed. Knowing the most common offending food allergens for these species would help determ...

    Authors: Ralf S. Mueller, Thierry Olivry and Pascal Prélaud

    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2016 12:9

    Published on:

  4. Content type: Research Article

    Restrictive (i.e. elimination)-provocation dietary trials remain the standard of care to diagnose cutaneous adverse food reactions (CAFRs) in dogs and cats. There is currently no consensus on the duration of e...

    Authors: Thierry Olivry, Ralf S. Mueller and Pascal Prélaud

    Citation: BMC Veterinary Research 2015 11:225

    Published on:

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