Skip to main content

Vaccine and Drug Ontologies (2023)

Edited by: 

Yongqun Oliver He
University of Michigan, USA

Cui Tao
Department of AI and Informatics at Mayo Clinic, USA

Junguk Hur
University of North Dakota, USA

Drugs and vaccines have contributed to dramatic improvements in public health worldwide. Over the last decade, there have been efforts in the biomedical ontology community that represents various areas associated with drugs including vaccines that extend existing health and clinical terminology systems (e.g., SNOMED, RxNorm, NDF- RT, and MedDRA), vernacular medical terminologies, ontologies (e.g., Drug Ontology, Vaccine Ontology, and Ontology of Adverse Events), and their applications to research and clinical data. This thematic series provides a platform for discussing innovative solutions as well as the challenges in the development and application of biomedical ontologies to representing and analyzing drugs and vaccines, their administration, immune responses induced, adverse events, and similar topics.

The thematic series will cover two main areas: (i) ontology representation of drugs (including vaccines), and (ii) applications of the ontologies in real-world situations - administration, adverse events, etc. Examples of biomedical subject matter in the scope of this workshop: drug components (e.g., drug active ingredients, vaccine antigens, and adjuvants), administration details (e.g., dosage, administration route, and frequency), gene immune responses and pathways, drug-drug or drug-food interactions, and adverse events. Both research and clinical subjects will be covered. We will also focus on computational methods used to study these, for example, literature mining of vaccine/drug-gene interaction networks, a meta-analysis of host immune responses, and time event analysis of the pharmacological effects.



  1. The increasing number of articles on adverse interactions that may occur when specific foods are consumed with certain drugs makes it difficult to keep up with the latest findings. Conflicting information is a...

    Authors: Rabia Azzi, Georgeta Bordea, Romain Griffier, Jean Noël Nikiema and Fleur Mougin
    Citation: Journal of Biomedical Semantics 2024 15:1