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The thyroid in pregnancy and infertility - challenges, diagnostics, and treatment

Guest Editor:
Sofie Bliddal, MD, PhD, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark

Submission Status: closed for submissions


Thyroid Research is calling for submissions to our collection on The thyroid in pregnancy and infertility-challenges, diagnostics, and treatment. Thyroid hormones play an essential role in female reproduction and fetal development. Thyroid dysfunction has been associated with both female infertility, early pregnancy loss, late-pregnancy adverse events, and offspring (neuro)development. Even the presence of thyroid autoimmunity without thyroid dysfunction has been associated with reproductive risks.  
Image credit: Karen Holm 

About the collection

Thyroid Research is calling for submissions to our Collection on The thyroid in pregnancy and infertility- challenges, diagnostics, and treatment. Thyroid hormones play an essential role in female reproduction and fetal development. Thyroid dysfunction has been associated with both female infertility, early pregnancy loss, late-pregnancy adverse events, and offspring (neuro)development. Even the presence of thyroid autoimmunity without thyroid dysfunction has been associated with reproductive risks. However, intervention studies aiming at correcting mild thyroid function aberrations have failed to show a clinical benefit, and studies refining the distinction between health and disease are greatly needed as well as studies enlightening the field of the potential mechanisms behind thyroid-related reproductive failure. While a focus on mild aberrations have gained much attention in recent decades, a renewed focus on overt thyroid disease applying modern assays, technologies and treatments seems timely. Finally, as evidence mounts on the long-term health impact of reproductive failure, thyroid-related reproductive failure may be an important predictor of long-term endocrine or autoimmune comorbidity. 

This collection of articles in Thyroid Research aims to present recent advances within the field of thyroid and reproduction. The call is open for any paper (systematic or narrative reviews, original research articles, and unique clinical cases) within the reach of the overall theme. 

Suggestions for possible topics could include:
•    Maternal thyroid function in pregnancy
•    Fetal development/programming
•    High risk phenotypes 
•    Interplay with the immune system
•    Interplay with other comorbidities 
•    Overt thyroid disease– prevalence, prognosis, and effect of treatment
•    Long-term impact of maternal thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy to the mother or child

Conflicts of interest:
Sofie Bliddal’s research salary is paid by the Capital Region of Denmark’s Research Foundation. Sofie Bliddal is an associate editor of Thyroid Research and Clinical Thyroidology and editor of Thyroid. She is a coauthor of the American Thyroid Association’s pending updated guidelines on thyroid in pregnancy and coauthor of the Danish Endocrine Society’s guidelines on thyroid in pregnancy and infertility (first edition published in 2015, revised in 2018 and 2022).

  1. Thyroid storm is a state of circulating thyroid hormone excess leading to multiorgan dysfunction and systemic decompensation. It typically occurs in the setting of poorly controlled hyperthyroidism and a preci...

    Authors: Vidhu Vadini, Prabhav Vasistha, Almog Shalit and Spyridoula Maraka
    Citation: Thyroid Research 2024 17:2
  2. Subclinical hypothyroidism in pregnancy and definition by upper thyrotropin (TSH) cutoff are controversial. As mitochondria are influenced by thyroid hormones, the purpose in this study was to measure expressi...

    Authors: Julie Kristine Guldberg Stryhn, Jacob Larsen, Palle Lyngsie Pedersen and Peter Haulund Gæde
    Citation: Thyroid Research 2023 16:38
  3. Evidence on the impact of thyroid hormone treatment (LT4) on maternal pregnancy outcomes in women with subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) without thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) positivity is scarce.

    Authors: Georgiana Sitoris, Flora Veltri, Emna Jelloul, Pierre Kleynen, Serge Rozenberg and Kris G. Poppe
    Citation: Thyroid Research 2023 16:29
  4. Graves’ disease (GD) is the main cause of hyperthyroidism in women of the fertile age. In pregnant women, the disease should be carefully managed and controlled to prevent maternal and fetal complications. Obs...

    Authors: Nanna Maria Uldall Torp, Inge Bülow Pedersen, Allan Carlé, Jesper Scott Karmisholt, Eva Ebbehøj, Diana Grove-Laugesen, Thomas Heiberg Brix, Steen Joop Bonnema, Bieke F. Schrijvers, Birte Nygaard, Lena Bjergved Sigurd, Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen, Marianne Klose, Åse Krogh Rasmussen, Stig Andersen and Stine Linding Andersen
    Citation: Thyroid Research 2023 16:11
  5. Thyroid disease in pregnant women is a matter of clinical awareness, and current clinical guidelines recommend a risk-based screening strategy. This study aimed to evaluate current clinical practice regarding ...

    Authors: Line Cleman Hatting, Marie Østergaard Kristensen, Maja Hjelm Lundgaard, Anne Sørensen and Stine Linding Andersen
    Citation: Thyroid Research 2023 16:9
  6. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD) is a benign, self-limiting disorder characterized by regional lymphadenopathy. Clinical symptoms range from mild fever and tenderness to upper respiratory syndrome. A few cases h...

    Authors: Bashar Bazkke, Joli Osman, Mohammad Shahrour, Mohammad Ziadeh, Aya Haji Mohamad, Mohamed Imad Eddin Mouhandes and Ammar Niazi
    Citation: Thyroid Research 2022 15:16

Submission Guidelines

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This Collection welcomes submission of Research Articles. Before submitting your manuscript, please ensure you have read our submission guidelines. Articles for this Collection should be submitted via our submission system, Snapp. During the submission process you will be asked whether you are submitting to a Collection, please select Collection title: The thyroid in pregnancy and infertility  - challenges, diagnostics, and treatment from the dropdown menu.

Articles will undergo the journal’s standard peer-review process and are subject to all of the journal’s standard policies. Articles will be added to the Collection as they are published.

The Guest Editors have no competing interests with the submissions which they handle through the peer review process. The peer review of any submissions for which the Guest Editors have competing interests is handled by another Editorial Board Member who has no competing interests.