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Retroviruses & the Microbiome

Edited by:
Ronald G. Collman, MD, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, United States of America
 

Submission Status: Closed

This collection is no longer accepting submissions.


Microbiome and Retrovirology is calling for submissions to our Collection on "Retroviruses & the Microbiome." The focus of this issue is to move beyond associations to mechanisms and functional interactions, including both replication-competent and endogenous retroviruses, human and non-human hosts, and implications for homeostasis, disease and/or therapeutics.


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Microbiome 

Retrovirology 

  1. People living with HIV (PLWH), even when viral replication is controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART), experience persistent inflammation. This inflammation is partly attributed to intestinal microbial...

    Authors: Shalini Singh, Leila B. Giron, Maliha W. Shaikh, Shivanjali Shankaran, Phillip A. Engen, Zlata R. Bogin, Simona A. Bambi, Aaron R. Goldman, Joao L. L. C. Azevedo, Lorena Orgaz, Nuria de Pedro, Patricia González, Martin Giera, Aswin Verhoeven, Elena Sánchez-López, Ivona Pandrea…
    Citation: Microbiome 2024 12:31
  2. The widespread availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically reduced mortality and improved life expectancy for people living with HIV (PLWH). However, even with HIV-1 suppression, chronic immu...

    Authors: Angela Sofia Burkhart Colorado, Alessandro Lazzaro, Charles Preston Neff, Nichole Nusbacher, Kathryn Boyd, Suzanne Fiorillo, Casey Martin, Janet C. Siebert, Thomas B. Campbell, Margaret Borok, Brent E. Palmer and Catherine Lozupone
    Citation: Microbiome 2024 12:18

About the collection

Microbiome and Retrovirology is calling for submissions to our Collection on "Retroviruses & the Microbiome." 

Mucosal surfaces are the site of most HIV transmission events.  Furthermore, the gastrointestinal mucosa is an early target for viral immune destruction, and persistent dysfunction of the barrier is implicated in allowing microbial translocation as a driver of chronic inflammation,  These studies of HIV reveal critical interactions between retroviruses and the global microbiome, which has illuminated the need to understand such relationships broadly across retroviruses, microbiome niches and host species.  

Retrovirus integration results in these viruses being an integral component of the host, whether replication competent or endogenous, and the microbiome is an equally integral component of the host organism.  Thus, understanding the integrated relationships is key to understanding not just infectious diseases but underlying integrated host physiology. 

The goal of this issue is to bring together new original research on and cutting-edge reviews of new insights the mechanistic basis for interactions between microbial components of the microbiome across species, retroviruses and microbial niches.  The focus of this issue is to move beyond associations to mechanisms and functional interactions, including both replication-competent and endogenous retroviruses, human and non-human hosts, and implications for homeostasis, disease and/or therapeutics.


Image credit: © Viks_jin / Stock.adobe.com

Submission Guidelines

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This Collection welcomes submission of Research Articles, Data Notes, Case Reports, Study Protocols, and Database Articles. Before submitting your manuscript, please ensure you have read the submission guidelines of the journal you are submitting to Microbiome and RetrovirologyArticles for this Collection should be submitted via our submission system, Snapp. During the submission process you will be asked whether you are submitting to a Collection, please select "Retroviruses & the Microbiome" from the dropdown menu.

Articles will undergo the standard peer-review process of the journal they are considered in Microbiome, Retrovirology and are subject to all of the journal’s standard policies. Articles will be added to the Collection as they are published.

The Guest Editors have no competing interests with the submissions which they handle through the peer review process. The peer review of any submissions for which the Guest Editors have competing interests is handled by another Editorial Board Member who has no competing interests.