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Onchocerciasis-associated epilepsy

Guest edited by Robert Colebunders, Robert Ryder, Patrick Suykerbuyk and Richard Idro

An article collection in Infectious Diseases of Poverty.

Infectious Diseases of PovertyNodding syndrome is a devastating epileptic syndrome appearing in previously healthy children between the ages of 5 and 18 years. The syndrome is characterized by head-nodding, an atonic seizure, and is often followed by tonic-clonic seizures, declining cognitive and motor function, psychiatric problems, stunting growth, physical deformities and early death. Until recently the cause of the syndrome was unknown. Therefore, no strategy for prevention and cure was possible. Recent studies have shown that nodding syndrome is only one of several clinical presentations of onchocerciasis-associated epilepsy (OAE) and that this form of epilepsy is present in all regions where onchocerciasis (river blindness) is poorly controlled. This series contains original papers about OAE research done in Uganda, Tanzania, Cameroon and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and review papers related to onchocerciasis and epilepsy.

  1. Content type: Editorial

    Recently, several epidemiological studies performed in Onchocerca volvulus-endemic regions have suggested that onchocerciasis-associated epilepsy (OAE) may constitute an important but neglected public health prob...

    Authors: Robert Colebunders, Michel Mandro, Alfred K. Njamnshi, Michel Boussinesq, An Hotterbeekx, Joseph Kamgno, Sarah O’Neill, Adrian Hopkins, Patrick Suykerbuyk, Maria-Gloria Basáñez, Rory J. Post, Belén Pedrique, Pierre-Marie Preux, Wilma A. Stolk, Thomas B. Nutman and Richard Idro

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:23

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