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Urban health and prevention and control of vector-borne diseases

Guest edited by Mariam Otmani del Barrio, Frédéric Simard and Andrea Caprara

An article collection published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty.

IDP TS-urban health © Fred JourdainMore than half of the world’s population currently lives in urban settlements that grow both in size and number. By 2050, approximately 60% of the global population will be living in urban conglomerations, mainly in low-and middle-income countries. Mobility, poverty, inequality and climate variability and change are some of the social and environmental factors that influence the exposure of human populations in urban settings to vector-borne diseases (VBDs) such as dengue, Chikungunya and Zika virus diseases, urban malaria, leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis, apart from water-borne diseases. These pose eminent public health challenges with emerging and re-emerging infections, particularly in the era of globalization, requiring strengthened intersectoral policy and action at the urban level. 

Accurate, consistent, and evidence-based interventions for VBD and other infectious diseases of poverty prevention and control in urban settings are needed to implement cost-effective public policy and to promote inclusive and equitable urban health services.

The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) hosted at the World Health Organization brought together global experts through the VERDAS Research Consortium to generate evidence on urban health interventions that address social and environmental determinants of health, and to conduct a research gap analysis, including a series of scoping reviews and a workshop to identify research priorities regarding urban health interventions for the prevention and control of vector-borne and other infectious diseases of poverty. This thematic series draws together the resulting scoping reviews and the ideas presented at the workshop and helps focus attention on the research gaps and policy implications that need to be filled in order to address VBDs at the urban level. 

  1. Content type: Research Article

    In 2015, following a call for proposals from the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), six scoping reviews on the prevention and control of vector-borne diseases in urban area...

    Authors: Christian Dagenais, Stéphanie Degroote, Mariam Otmani Del Barrio, Clara Bermudez-Tamayo and Valéry Ridde

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:85

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  2. Content type: Scoping Review

    Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) continue to represent a global threat, with “old” diseases like malaria, and “emergent” or “re-emergent” ones like Zika, because of an increase in international trade, demographic ...

    Authors: Florence Fournet, Frédéric Jourdain, Emmanuel Bonnet, Stéphanie Degroote and Valéry Ridde

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:99

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  3. Content type: Scoping Review

    The emergence and re-emergence of vector-borne and other infectious diseases of poverty pose a threat to the health of populations living in urban and low-income settings. A detailed understanding of intervent...

    Authors: Laurence Campeau, Stéphanie Degroote, Valery Ridde, Mabel Carabali and Kate Zinszer

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:95

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  4. Content type: Commentary

    More than half of the world’s population currently lives in urban settlements that grow both in size and number. By 2050, approximately 70% of the global population will be living in urban conglomerations, mai...

    Authors: Mariam Otmani del Barrio, Frédéric Simard and Andrea Caprara

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:94

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  5. Content type: Scoping Review

    Transmission dynamics, vectorial capacity, and co-infections have substantial impacts on vector-borne diseases (VBDs) affecting urban and suburban populations. Reviewing key factors can provide insight into pr...

    Authors: Marcus Eder, Fanny Cortes, Noêmia Teixeira de Siqueira Filha, Giovanny Vinícius Araújo de França, Stéphanie Degroote, Cynthia Braga, Valéry Ridde and Celina Maria Turchi Martelli

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:90

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  6. Content type: Scoping Review

    The control of vector-borne diseases (VBD) is one of the greatest challenges on the global health agenda. Rapid and uncontrolled urbanization has heightened the interest in addressing these challenges through ...

    Authors: Jorge Marcos-Marcos, Antonio Olry de Labry-Lima, Silvia Toro-Cardenas, Marina Lacasaña, Stéphanie Degroote, Valéry Ridde and Clara Bermudez-Tamayo

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:83

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  7. Content type: Scoping Review

    Over half the world’s human populations are currently at risk from vector-borne diseases (VBDs), and the heaviest burden is borne by the world’s poorest people, communities, and countries. The aim of this stud...

    Authors: Stéphanie Degroote, Kate Zinszer and Valéry Ridde

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:96

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  8. Content type: Scoping Review

    Health personnel face challenges in diagnosing vector-borne and other diseases of poverty in urban settings. There is a need to know what rapid diagnostic technologies are available, have been properly assesse...

    Authors: Lyda Osorio, Jonny Alejandro Garcia, Luis Gabriel Parra, Victor Garcia, Laura Torres, Stéphanie Degroote and Valéry Ridde

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:87

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  9. Content type: Study Protocol

    This paper presents the overall approach undertaken by the “VEctor boRne DiseAses Scoping reviews” (VERDAS) consortium in response to a call issued by the Vectors, Environment and Society unit of the Special P...

    Authors: Stéphanie Degroote, Clara Bermudez-Tamayo and Valéry Ridde

    Citation: Infectious Diseases of Poverty 2018 7:98

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