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Breast Cancer Risk Factors

Edited by:
Lewis Chodosh: University of Pennsylvania, USA

Submission Status: Closed


Breast Cancer Research is presenting our Retrospective Collection on "Breast Cancer Risk Factors." 

With this Collection, we aim to gain valuable insights into the multifaceted aspects of breast cancer risk to promote awareness, prevention, and early detection.

About the collection

Breast Cancer Research is presenting our Retrospective Collection on "Breast Cancer Risk Factors."

Explore a comprehensive collection of risk factors associated with breast cancer, shedding light on genetic predisposition, lifestyle choices, hormonal influences, and environmental factors that may contribute to this complex disease. Gain valuable insights into the multifaceted aspects of breast cancer risk to promote awareness, prevention, and early detection.

Image credit: © Maksym / stock.adobe.com

  1. Latin American and Hispanic women are less likely to develop breast cancer (BC) than women of European descent. Observational studies have found an inverse relationship between the individual proportion of Nat...

    Authors: Linda Zollner, Diana Torres, Ignacio Briceno, Michael Gilbert, Gabriela Torres-Mejía, Joe Dennis, Manjeet K. Bolla, Qin Wang, Ute Hamann and Justo Lorenzo Bermejo
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:111
  2. Emerging data indicate that variations in quantitative epithelial and stromal tissue composition and their relative abundance in benign breast biopsies independently impact risk of future invasive breast cance...

    Authors: Mustapha Abubakar, Alyssa Klein, Shaoqi Fan, Scott Lawrence, Karun Mutreja, Jill E. Henry, Ruth M. Pfeiffer, Maire A. Duggan and Gretchen L. Gierach
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:97
  3. Laboratory studies have indicated that a cholesterol metabolite and selective estrogen receptor modulator, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), may be important in breast cancer etiology and explain associations betw...

    Authors: Mindy C. DeRouen, Juan Yang, Yuqing Li, Adrian A. Franke, Anne N. Tome, Kami K. White, Brenda Y. Hernandez, Yurii Shvetsov, Veronica Setiawan, Anna H. Wu, Lynne R. Wilkens, Loïc Le Marchand, Lenora W. M. Loo and Iona Cheng
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:95
  4. Genome-wide studies of gene–environment interactions (G×E) may identify variants associated with disease risk in conjunction with lifestyle/environmental exposures. We conducted a genome-wide G×E analysis of ~...

    Authors: Pooja Middha, Xiaoliang Wang, Sabine Behrens, Manjeet K. Bolla, Qin Wang, Joe Dennis, Kyriaki Michailidou, Thomas U. Ahearn, Irene L. Andrulis, Hoda Anton-Culver, Volker Arndt, Kristan J. Aronson, Paul L. Auer, Annelie Augustinsson, Thaïs Baert, Laura E. Beane Freeman…
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:93
  5. Breast density is strongly associated with breast cancer risk. Fully automated quantitative density assessment methods have recently been developed that could facilitate large-scale studies, although data on a...

    Authors: Laurel A. Habel, Stacey E. Alexeeff, Ninah Achacoso, Vignesh A. Arasu, Aimilia Gastounioti, Lawrence Gerstley, Robert J. Klein, Rhea Y. Liang, Jafi A. Lipson, Walter Mankowski, Laurie R. Margolies, Joseph H. Rothstein, Daniel L. Rubin, Li Shen, Adriana Sistig, Xiaoyu Song…
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:92
  6. Microbial dysbiosis has emerged as an important element in the development and progression of various cancers, including breast cancer. However, the microbial composition of the breast from healthy individuals...

    Authors: Rana German, Natascia Marino, Chris Hemmerich, Ram Podicheti, Douglas B. Rusch, Leah T. Stiemsma, Hongyu Gao, Xiaoling Xuei, Pam Rockey and Anna Maria Storniolo
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:82
  7. Height, body mass index (BMI), and weight gain are associated with breast cancer risk in the general population. It is unclear whether these associations also exist for carriers of pathogenic variants in the BRCA...

    Authors: Karin Kast, Esther M. John, John L. Hopper, Nadine Andrieu, Catherine Noguès, Emmanuelle Mouret-Fourme, Christine Lasset, Jean-Pierre Fricker, Pascaline Berthet, Véronique Mari, Lucie Salle, Marjanka K. Schmidt, Margreet G. E. M. Ausems, Encarnacion B. Gomez Garcia, Irma van de Beek, Marijke R. Wevers…
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:72
  8. Moderate to heavy alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. The etiologic role of genetic variation in genes involved in ethanol metabolism has not been established, with littl...

    Authors: Kristin L. Young, Andrew F. Olshan, Kathryn Lunetta, Mariaelisa Graff, Lindsay A. Williams, Song Yao, Gary R. Zirpoli, Melissa Troester and Julie R. Palmer
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:66
  9. Many factors, including reproductive hormones, have been linked to a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer (BC). We reviewed the literature regarding the relationship between ovulatory menstrual cycles (MCs...

    Authors: Herjan J. T. Coelingh Bennink, Iman J. Schultz, Marcus Schmidt, V. Craig Jordan, Paula Briggs, Jan F. M. Egberts, Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson, Ludwig Kiesel, Kirsten Kluivers, Jan Krijgh, Tommaso Simoncini, Frank Z. Stanczyk and Robert D. Langer
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:60
  10. Breast cancer (BC) is one of the most burdensome cancers worldwide. Despite advancements in diagnostic and treatment modalities, developing countries are still dealing with increasing burdens and existing disp...

    Authors: Armin Aryannejad, Sahar Saeedi Moghaddam, Baharnaz Mashinchi, Mohammadreza Tabary, Negar Rezaei, Sarvenaz Shahin, Nazila Rezaei, Mohsen Naghavi, Bagher Larijani and Farshad Farzadfar
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:47

    The Correction to this article has been published in Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:70

  11. Modifiable risk factors (alcohol, smoking, obesity, hormone use, and physical activity) affect a woman’s breast cancer (BC) risk. Whether these factors affect BC risk in women with inherited risk (family histo...

    Authors: Sarah Y. Cohen, Carolyn R. Stoll, Akila Anandarajah, Michelle Doering and Graham A. Colditz
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:45
  12. Higher circulating prolactin has been associated with increased breast cancer risk. Prolactin binding to the prolactin receptor (PRLR) can activate the transcription factor STAT5, thus, we examined the associa...

    Authors: Cassandra A. Hathaway, Megan S. Rice, Laura C. Collins, Dilys Chen, David A. Frank, Sarah Walker, Charles V. Clevenger, Rulla M. Tamimi, Shelley S. Tworoger and Susan E. Hankinson
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:24
  13. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women with limited treatment options. To identify promising drug targets for breast cancer, we conducted a systematical Mendelian randomization (MR) study to scree...

    Authors: Yu Wang, Fanghua Liu, Lulu Sun, Yiming Jia, Pinni Yang, Daoxia Guo, Mengyao Shi, Aili Wang, Guo-Chong Chen, Yonghong Zhang and Zhengbao Zhu
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:9
  14. Guidelines recommend shared decision making (SDM) for mammography screening for women ≥ 75 and not screening women with < 10-year life expectancy. High-quality SDM requires consideration of women’s breast canc...

    Authors: Mara A. Schonberg, Emily A. Wolfson, A. Heather Eliassen, Kimberly A. Bertrand, Yurii B. Shvetsov, Bernard A. Rosner, Julie R. Palmer and Long H. Ngo
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:8
  15. Breast cancer incidence rates have not declined despite an improvement in risk prediction and the identification of modifiable risk factors, suggesting the need to identify novel risk factors and etiological p...

    Authors: Victoria L. Stevens, Brian D. Carter, Eric J. Jacobs, Marjorie L. McCullough, Lauren R. Teras and Ying Wang
    Citation: Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:5

    The Correction to this article has been published in Breast Cancer Research 2023 25:15