Chi Van Dang

 Chi Van Dang

Abramson Cancer Centre, University of Pennsylvania, USA

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Cancer & Metabolism welcomes studies on all aspects of the relationship between cancer and metabolism, including:

  • Molecular biology and genetics of cancer metabolism
  • Whole-body metabolism, including diabetes and obesity, in relation to cancer
  • Metabolomics in relation to cancer
  • Metabolism-based imaging
  • Preclinical and clinical studies of metabolism-related cancer therapies

Chi Van Dang, MD, PhD is a professor, physician-researcher, renowned cancer biologist and hematologist-oncologist, who serves as director of the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

"After several decades of profound advances in our understanding of the genetics and molecular biology of cancer, it has become self-evident that metabolism and bioenergetics are regulated by cancer genes and are intimately linked to the growth and survival of cancer cells.  The obesity pandemic connected to increased cancer risk further underscore the importance of a richer understanding of cancer and organismal metabolism.  In this regard, Cancer & Metabolism is launched uniquely to fulfil the needs of a burgeoning field which is at the crossroads of many scientific disciplines."

Chi Van Dang, MD, PhD is a professor, physician-researcher, renowned cancer biologist and hematologist-oncologist, who serves as director of the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania. His laboratory has contributed to the understanding of the function of the Myc cancer gene, which has emerged as a central transcription factor, or gene switch, in many different human cancers.

His group documented the function of Myc in regulating microRNAs that have been implicated in tumorigenesis, and his laboratory established the first mechanistic link between the Myc cancer gene and cellular energy metabolism, contributing to the concept that genetic alterations re-program tumors to render them addicted to certain fuel sources.  His work and those of others have led to the concept that Myc is a central regulator of cell proliferation and cellular metabolism. His laboratory is now exploiting these concepts for therapeutic targeting of cancer cell metabolism as a new way to treat cancer.

Born in Saigon, Vietnam, Dr. Dang arrived in the United States in 1967 and earned a BS in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 1975, followed by a PhD in chemistry at Georgetown University and MD degree from The Johns Hopkins University. Prior to joining the University of Pennsylvania, he was a professor at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Vice Dean for Research and Executive Director of The Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering.  He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and is the author of more than 200 scientific publications.

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