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Corrections (Mia Svantesson, 12 June 2014)

Unfortunately, we have found two errors in the authorlist. Jan Shildman should be spelled JAN SHILDMANN and the correct affiliation for number 6 is: Department of Medical Humanities, EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, Free University Medical Centre (VUmc), Amsterdam, the Netherlands.   read full comment

Comment on: Svantesson et al. BMC Medical Ethics, 15:30

"Open access" a 3rd world view (Riaz Uddin, 15 April 2013)

Apart from the ethical concerns I think open access initiative is a blessing for the researchers in low income countries (LIC). For example you may search Scholar Google or PubMed with specific keywords and get thousands of results. If it is not an open access article you will find "get access...pay X USD". Assume X = 30 USD. You need to access 10 articles for the purpose of literature review. So, you need 300 USD (this is hypothetical) for writing the introduction.... read full comment

Comment on: Parker BMC Medical Ethics, 14:16

Answers to the comments by Karayi Mohan (Bengt Kayser, 11 October 2007)

[Our responses to the letter 'In defence of dope control' by Karayi Mohanare are in italics]This writer’s arguments are a veritable catalogue of informal fallacies. But since they are so widespread in public discourse, we will discuss them in some detail. For clarity we cite the writer’s arguments preceded by excerpts of our original text, and comment on the writer’s arguments in a point-to-point fashion.“A doctor friend of mine, who is into sports medicine and handles dope control, has been arguing for many years that “controlled doping” or “supervised doping” should be permitted and that dope control should be left to the medical community rather than sports officialdom to regulate.Needless to say he is in complete... read full comment

Comment on: Kayser et al. BMC Medical Ethics, 8:2

The Feelings of High Level Decision Makers is Irrelevant to the Allocation of Resources in Healthcare (Tom Shillock, 18 June 2007)

Why do the authors assume that their survey was needed to illuminate the feelings of high-level decision-makers (HDMs) in allocating scarce healthcare resources? Or that the feelings of the HDMs could shed light on how to allocate scarce resources for healthcare in the face of aging populations?Everyone knows that resources for healthcare are finite and that distributions are largely iniquitous. Deciding the morally best or even better way to allocate those resources is necessarily an ethical endeavor. But the authors’ survey and discussion of the HDMs job feelings about such decisions does not reveal a moral psychology different from that of any other human being, it would be quite surprising and suspect if it did.HDMs who felt that budgetary constraints precluded them from acting... read full comment

Comment on: Mamhidir et al. BMC Medical Ethics, 8:3

In defence of dope control (Karayi Mohan, 18 June 2007)

A doctor friend of mine, who is into sports medicine and handles dope control, has been arguing for many years that “controlled doping” or “supervised doping” should be permitted and that dope control should be left to the medical community rather than sports officialdom to regulate.Needless to say he is in complete agreement with the paper presented here and even thinks that some of the points had been borrowed from papers and lectures he had been giving around the world the past few years.Neither he nor the learned authors of this paper has explained why doping per se is necessary in sports, though my doctor friend often argues that the world is looking for “record-breaking performances” all the time and the athletes cannot be expected to better records... read full comment

Comment on: Kayser et al. BMC Medical Ethics, 8:2

Time for a road trip (Peter Battershill, 28 June 2005)

In this article, The Top 10 health care ethics challenges facing the public: views of Toronto bioethicists, the authors identify the limitations inherent in interviewing only Toronto-based ethicists (themselves), but then go on to proclaim the "top ten" list for the entire country. This list was published with the intent of focusing public debate on these issues and indeed was cited in several newspapers. Unforunately, there is a major ommission in this listing, namely the health disparaties experienced by Canada's aboriginal people. The persisting significant differences in the health outcomes of this population including decreased life expectancy, increased rates of acute and chronic illnesses, and high prevalence of suicide should be headline news. Until these issues come to the... read full comment

Comment on: Breslin et al. BMC Medical Ethics, 6:5

Professional Caregiver Insurance Risk, Medical Outliers, and the Duty to Treat (Thomas Cox, 10 June 2005)

To fully understand and respond to the ethical issues raised by high cost clients (Medical outliers) we must consider the relatively incomplete specification of the impact of prospective payment systems, DRGs, and capitation contracts. All these mechanisms involve an element of "risk/profit" sharing for providers and this point is well acknowledged by the authors. However, the risk/profit sharing has another name as well. When one entity assumes financial risks from another entity in return for a payment that is, on average, approximately equal to the expected costs of those financial risks, the transaction is usually called “Insurance.” I use the term “Professional Caregiver Insurance Risk” for the insurance risks assumed by physicians, hospitals, and other health... read full comment

Comment on: Papadimos et al. BMC Medical Ethics, 5:3