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Important "negative" report confirming a clinical pearl (Run Yu, 08 September 2014)

I commend BMC Endocrine Disorders on publishing this article by Qiao et al who report that CGA levels are usually normal in patients with insulinomas. To be frank, the results are not surprising to specialists on neuroendocrine tumors. Insulinoma workup algorithm does not require CGA measurement. Insulinoma diagnosis is based on hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and pancreatic mass. In clinical practice, though, I often see non-specialist physicians order CGA test and use a normal CGA result as evidence against insulinoma. When I discuss with non-specialist physicians about CGA in insulinoma diagnosis, they often ask if there is a study to support my experience. Now I can point to this paper for... read full comment

Comment on: Qiao et al. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 14:64

Comments on Epidemiology and Costs of Diabetes Mellitus in Switzerland: An Analysis of Healthcare Claims Data for 2006 and 2011 (Shabnam Asghari, 24 July 2014)

S. Asghari, O. Hurley, M.... read full comment

Comment on: Huber et al. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 14:44

Addition to acknowledgements  (Sarah Hosking, 05 March 2014)

In addition to the above comment, the  'Nailfold capillaroscopy image assessment tool' was published in Michael Tong's 2008 thesis titled "Evaluation of Video Capillaroscopy as a Method of Assessing the Microcirculation of the Nail Fold in Raynaud's Phenomenon and Related Small Vessel Diseases". This was completed as part of a Bachelor of Medical Science at the University of Newcastle.

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Comment on: Hosking et al. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 13:41

Addition to acknowledgements (Sarah Hosking, 31 December 2013)

The authors would like to thank Dr Michael Tong for the 'Nailfold capillaroscopy image assessment tool' (figure II), developed as part of a previous Autoimmune Resource and Research project and adapted in reference to EULAR capillaroscopy scoring guidelines (17). read full comment

Comment on: Hosking et al. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 13:41

Erratum (Nasser Al-Daghri, 26 September 2013)

Author name: Khalid M. Alkhrafy should be Khalid M. Alkharfy read full comment

Comment on: Aljohani et al. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 13:31

Citation (Valentina Gburcik, 23 June 2011)

In a recent review of the literature, we realised that we omitted to cite the following important publication on miR-21 in the present article:

MiR-21 regulates adipogenic differentiation through the modulation of TGF-beta signaling in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue. Kim YJ, Hwang SJ, Bae YC, Jung JS. Stem Cells. 2009 Dec; 27(12):3093-102.
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Comment on: Keller et al. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 11:7

Femoral neck may be the better site to be evaluated when measuring BMD (sergio toledo, 24 October 2006)

As far as I know, femoral neck is the better site to be analyzed when hip bone mineral density (BMD) must be studied. Other hip bone subsites may be not so informative. Thus, instead of total hip BMD the authors might have used BMD data coming from femoral neck to compare with lumbar spine BMD findings in these cases. read full comment

Comment on: Moayyeri et al. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 5:3

Doubts on statistical validity (Angelika Schaffrath Rosario, 04 July 2006)

I wonder whether a study with 11 children in an age range of 9 years can give any reliable quantitative information on neurocognitive function. It's no wonder that there are no significant results with this small sample size. Also, there seems to be no clear design in this study. read full comment

Comment on: Aijaz et al. BMC Endocrine Disorders, 6:2

Reversible hypothyroidism due to Whipple syndrome: may be not (Yair Liel, 22 May 2006)

The arguments are somewhat speculative and the data is far from being compelling regarding the casual association between Whipple's and hypothyroidism. An alternative -and more realistic, in my view- interpretation could be, that the patient had sub-clinical hypothyroidism or limited thyroid reserves (e.g. seronegative Hashimoto or post thyroiditis state) that became overt due to malabsorption and thyroid-hormone loss during entero-hepatic cycle and malabsorption of exogenous thyroxine (I would expect a comment on family history of thyroid disease, which I couldn't find). Once Whipple's and malabsorption subsided, she returned to her baseline status. read full comment

Comment on: Tran BMC Endocrine Disorders, 6:3