Lixin Wei and Yihong Ye win the Ming K Jeang Award for Excellence in Cell & Bioscience

Posted by Biome on 24th March 2014 - 1 Comment


The Ming K Jeang Award for Excellence in Cell & Bioscience honours research of the highest quality and impact published in the official journal of the Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America (SCBA), Cell & Bioscience. A panel of leading scientists on the Editorial Board, chaired by Yun-Fai Chris Lau from the University of California, San Francisco, USA, select the winning articles each year, reflecting the best biological and medical advances published by Cell & Bioscience. The winners for research published in 2013 were revealed by Cell & Bioscience Editor-in-Chief Yun-Bo Shi in this Editorial.

This year’s winning articles tackled endosome trafficking – with Yihong Ye from the NIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, USA, and colleagues revealing that ‘Monoubiquitination of EEA1 regulates endosome fusion and trafficking’ –  and probed the cellular response to hepatitc ishchemia with Lixin Wei from Shanghai Jiaotong University, China, and colleagues revealing that ‘Autophagy lessens ischemic liver injury by reducing oxidative damage’.

Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, namely damage caused to a tissue when its blood supply is returned after a period of lack of oxygen, is a common complication during liver surgery, particularly in transplantation, trauma and resection. Using both in vitro experiments in a human liver cell line and in vivo experiments in rats, Wei and colleagues demonstrate that not only is autophagy induced during I/R but also has a protective role by eliminating mitochondria that would otherwise generate reactive oxygen species and contribute to necrosis.

 

“These results suggest a potential therapeutic strategy using pre-treatment in liver surgery”

Award judge Yun-Bo Shi, Editor-in-Chief of Cell & Bioscience

 

Leaving the autophagosome behind and looking elsewhere along the trafficking pathway, Ye and colleagues investigate the regulatory mechanisms behind endosome fusion. Early endosomal autoantigen 1 (EEA1) is known to be essential for this process. Research in Cell & Bioscience now shows how EEA1 ubiquitination regulates this key component, determining both the size of the endosomes and their trafficking pattern. Award judge T C Wu highlighted the importance of this research:

 

“The understanding of these molecular mechanisms may serve as an important foundation for altering the trafficking of endosomes through manipulation of the ubiquitination pathway.”

Award judge T C Wu, Johns Hopkins University

 

The Awards presented to Ye, Wei, and colleagues are made possible through the generous donation from the Ming K Jeang Foundation, USA.

For more about how Cell & Bioscience came about, and the SCBA, read what its Editor-in-Chief Yun-Bo Shi had to say here.

 

More about the author(s)

Lixin Wei, Director, Medical Sciences Research Center of Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, China.

Lixin Wei, Director, Medical Sciences Research Center of Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, China.

Lixin Wei is a Professor and Director at both the Tumor Immunology and Gene Therapy Center of the Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, China, and the Medical Sciences Research Center of Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, China. He obtained his PhD at the Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University and went on to work at the Laboratory of Gene Regulation and Development at the NIH National Institute of Child Health and Development, and in the Department of Molecular Genetics, Microbiology and Immunology at the UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, USA. With a broad background in digestive diseases, Wei has a specific interest in liver injury and liver cancer.

Yihong Ye, senior investigator, NIH National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases, USA.

Yihong Ye, senior investigator, NIH National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases, USA.

 

Yihong Ye is a senior investigator at the NIH National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases (NIDDKD), USA. He obtained his PhD University of Pennsylvania, USA and went on to pursue his postdoctoral research in the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School, USA. Ye then joined the NIH NIDDKD as a tenure track investigator. His current research interests focus on elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis, specifically the quality control pathway termed ER-associated degradation (ERAD) or retrotranslocation.

Research

Autophagy lessens ischemic liver injury by reducing oxidative damage

Sun K, Xie X, Liu Y, Han Z, Zhao X, Cai N, Zhang S, Song J et al.
Cell & Bioscience 2013, 3:26

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Research

Monoubiquitination of EEA1 regulates endosome fusion and trafficking

Ramanathan HN, Zhang G and Ye Y
Cell & Bioscience 2013, 3:24

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