Open Access Research article

Regionally accentuated reversible brain grey matter reduction in ultra marathon runners detected by voxel-based morphometry

Wolfgang Freund1*, Sonja Faust1, Christian Gaser2, Georg Grön3, Frank Birklein4, Arthur P Wunderlich1, Marguerite Müller1, Christian Billich1 and Uwe H Schütz15

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, 89081 Ulm, Germany

2 Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Jena University Hospital, Jahnstraße 3, 07743 Jena, Germany

3 Section Neuropsychology and Functional Imaging, University Hospital Ulm, Leimgrubenweg 12-14, 89073 Ulm, Germany

4 Department of Neurology, Mainz University Medical Center, Langenbeckstraße 1/503, 55131 Mainz, Germany

5 Outpatient Rehabilitation Center at University Hospital Ulm, Pfarrer-Weiß-Weg 10, 89077 Ulm, Germany

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BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation 2014, 6:4  doi:10.1186/2052-1847-6-4

Published: 17 January 2014

Abstract

Background

During the 4,487 km ultra marathon TransEurope-FootRace 2009 (TEFR09), runners showed catabolism with considerable reduction of body weight as well as reversible brain volume reduction. We hypothesized that ultra marathon athletes might have developed changes to grey matter (GM) brain morphology due to the burden of extreme physical training. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) we undertook a cross sectional study and two longitudinal studies.

Methods

Prior to the start of the race 13 runners volunteered to participate in this study of planned brain scans before, twice during, and 8 months after the race. A group of matched controls was recruited for comparison. Twelve runners were able to participate in the scan before the start of the race and were taken into account for comparison with control persons. Because of drop-outs during the race, VBM could be performed in 10 runners covering the first 3 time points, and in 7 runners who also had the follow-up scan after 8 months. Volumetric 3D datasets were acquired using an MPRAGE sequence. A level of p < 0.05, family-wise corrected for multiple comparisons was the a priori set statistical threshold to infer significant effects from VBM.

Results

Baseline comparison of TEFR09 participants and controls revealed no significant differences regarding GM brain volume. During the race however, VBM revealed GM volume decreases in regionally distributed brain regions. These included the bilateral posterior temporal and occipitoparietal cortices as well as the anterior cingulate and caudate nucleus. After eight months, GM normalized.

Conclusion

Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not observe significant differences between TEFR09 athletes and controls at baseline. If this missing difference is not due to small sample size, extreme physical training obviously does not chronically alter GM.

However, during the race GM volume decreased in brain regions normally associated with visuospatial and language tasks. The reduction of the energy intensive default mode network as a means to conserve energy during catabolism is discussed. The changes were reversible after 8 months.

Despite substantial changes to brain composition during the catabolic stress of an ultra marathon, the observed differences seem to be reversible and adaptive.

Keywords:
Voxel based morphometry; VBM; Catabolism; Plasticity; Brain; Default mode network; MRI; Ultra marathon