Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Psychology and BioMed Central.

Open Access Research article

Suicide prevention in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and psychosis: a systematic review

Tara Donker1*, Alison Calear2, Janie Busby Grant3, Bregje van Spijker1, Katherine Fenton2, Kanupriya Kalia Hehir2, Pim Cuijpers45 and Helen Christensen1

Author Affiliations

1 Black Dog Institute, University of New South Wales Hospital Road, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, Sydney NSW 2031, Australia

2 Centre for Mental Health Research, Australian National University, Building 64, 63 Eggleston Road, Canberra ACT 2601, Australia

3 University of Canberra, University Drive Bruce, Canberra ACT 2617, Australia

4 Department of Clinical Psychology, VU University, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081, BT Amsterdam, the Netherlands

5 EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081, BT Amsterdam, the Netherlands

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Psychology 2013, 1:6  doi:10.1186/2050-7283-1-6

Published: 30 April 2013

Abstract

Background

The incidence of suicide is high among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and psychosis. A systematic review was performed to investigate the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in reducing suicidal behaviour among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and psychosis.

Methods

Cochrane, PubMed and PsycINFO databases were searched to January 2012. Additional materials were obtained from reference lists. Randomised Controlled Trials describing psychosocial interventions for psychotic disorders with attention placebo, treatment as usual (TAU), no intervention or waitlist control groups were included.

Results

In total, 11,521 abstracts were identified. Of those, 10 papers describing 11 trials targeting psychosocial interventions for reducing suicidal behaviour in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and psychosic symptoms or disorders met the inclusion criteria. Odds Ratios describing the likelihood of a reduction in suicidal behaviour or ideation ranged from 0.09 to 1.72 at post-test and 0.13 to 1.48 at follow-up.

Conclusions

Psychosocial interventions may be effective in reducing suicidal behaviour in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and psychosis, although the additional benefit of these interventions above that contributed by a control condition or treatment-as-usual is not clear.

Keywords:
Suicidal behaviour; Suicide; Psychosocial treatments; Psychotic disorders; Prevention