Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from BMC Research Notes and BioMed Central.

Open Access Case Report

Human infections due to Salmonella Blockley, a rare serotype in South Africa: a case report

Thandubuhle Gonose16*, Anthony M Smith12, Karen H Keddy12, Arvinda Sooka1, Victoria Howell3, Charlene Ann Jacobs4, Sumayya Haffejee3 and Premi Govender5

Author Affiliations

1 Centre for Enteric Diseases (CED), National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD) of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), Johannesburg, South Africa

2 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

3 Department of Microbiology, Greys Pathology Laboratory, NHLS, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

4 Division of Surveillance, Outbreak Response and Travel Health, NICD, NHLS, Johannesburg, South Africa

5 KwaZulu Natal Department of Health, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

6 Centre for Enteric Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Private Bag X4, 2131, Gauteng, Sandringham, South Africa

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Research Notes 2012, 5:562  doi:10.1186/1756-0500-5-562

Published: 10 October 2012

Abstract

Background

Infections due to nontyphoidal Salmonella have increased worldwide over the last couple of decades. Salmonella enterica serotype Blockley (Salmonella Blockley) infections is associated with chickens and is a rarely isolated serotype in human infections in most countries.

Case presentation

We report a case of human infections due to Salmonella Blockley in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa in 2011. Three African males (aged 4, 14 and 16) presented to a clinic with diarrhoea, stomach cramps and headache. They started experiencing signs of illness a day after they consumed a common meal, consisting of meat, rice and potatoes. Stool specimens from the patients cultured Salmonella Blockley. The strains showed an indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern.

Conclusion

This is the first recorded case of human infections due to Salmonella Blockley in South Africa.

Keywords:
Human infections; Salmonella Blockley; Rare serotype