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Open Access Technical Note

Establishment of a PCR analysis method for canine BRCA2

Yasunaga Yoshikawa1*, Masami Morimatsu2, Kazuhiko Ochiai3, Kento Okuda1, Takahiro Taoda4, Seishiro Chikazawa5, Asako Shimamura6, Toshinori Omi3, Makoto Bonkobara6, Koichi Orino1 and Kiyotaka Watanabe1

Author Affiliations

1 Laboratory of Veterinary Biochemistry, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Aomori 034-8628, Japan

2 Division of Disease Model Innovation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0815, Japan

3 Department of Basic Science, School of Veterinary Nursing and Technology, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, Tokyo 180-8602, Japan

4 Department of Small Animal Surgery 2, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Aomori 034-8628, Japan

5 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine 2, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, Aomori 034-8628, Japan

6 Department of Veterinary Science, School of Veterinary Medicine, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, Tokyo 180-8602, Japan

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BMC Research Notes 2012, 5:173  doi:10.1186/1756-0500-5-173

Published: 3 April 2012

Abstract

Background

Mammary tumors are the most common tumor type in both human and canine females. In women, carriers of mutations in BRCA2, a tumor suppressor gene product, have a higher risk of breast cancer. Canine BRCA2 has also been suggested to have a relationship with mammary tumors. However, clearly deleterious BRCA2 mutations have not been identified in any canine mammary tumors, as appropriate methods to detect mutations or a consensus BRCA2 sequence have not been reported.

Findings

For amplification and sequencing of BRCA2, we designed 14 and 20 PCR primer sets corresponding to the BRCA2 open reading frame (ORF) and all 27 exons, respectively, including exon-intron boundaries of the canine BRCA2 regions, respectively. To define the consensus canine BRCA2 ORF sequence, we used established methods to sequence the full-length canine BRCA2 ORF sequence from two ovaries and a testis obtained from individual healthy mongrel dogs and partially sequence BRCA2 genomic sequences in 20-56 tumor-free dogs, each aged over 6 years. Subsequently, we compared these sequences and seven previously reported sequences, and defined the most common base sequences as the consensus canine BRCA2 ORF sequence. Moreover, we established a detection method for identifying splicing variants. Unexpectedly, we also identified novel splicing variants in normal testes during establishment of these methods.

Conclusions

The present analysis methods for determining the BRCA2 base sequence and for detecting BRCA2 splicing variants and the BRCA2 ORF consensus sequence are useful for better understanding the relationship between canine BRCA2 mutation status and cancer risk.