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Open Access Short Report

Cryptosporidium and Strongyloides stercoralis infections among people with and without HIV infection and efficiency of diagnostic methods for Strongyloides in Yirgalem Hospital, southern Ethiopia

Amde Getaneh1, Girmay Medhin2 and Techalew Shimelis3*

Author Affiliations

1 Hawassa Regional Laboratory, Hawassa, Ethiopia

2 Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

3 Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia

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BMC Research Notes 2010, 3:90  doi:10.1186/1756-0500-3-90

Published: 1 April 2010

Abstract

Background

Cryptosporidiosis and strongyloidiasis have been reported to be associated with HIV/AIDS. The present study was designed to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Strongyloides stercoralis infections among people with and without HIV infection and also assess the efficient methods for detection of Strongyloides.

Findings

A cross-sectional study was conducted in Yirgalem Hospital, southern Ethiopia from March, 2007 to October, 2007. Demographic data and stool samples were collected from 384 individuals (192 from each HIV serogroup). Samples were processed using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique for detection of Cryptosporidium species. Stool samples were also processed using the direct saline mount, the formol-ether and the water-emergence techniques for diagnosis of S. stercoralis. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium and S. stercoralis among HIV infected individuals was 25% and 12.0%, respectively. HIV positive individuals had significantly higher rate of infection with Cryptosporidium (OR = 15.7; 95% CI 5.5 to 44.5) and S. stercoralis (OR = 6.4; 95% CI 2.2 to 18.9). Among the three diagnostic methods, the larvae of S. stercoralis were more efficiently detected by the water-emergence technique.

Conclusions

In this study, the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and S. stercoralis infections was significantly higher among people with HIV/AIDS. Educating HIV infected individuals to prevent acquisition of Cryptosporidium infection and screening for S. stercoralis using the water-emergence technique is likely to be helpful.