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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Wild boar: an increasing concern for Aujeszky's disease control in pigs?

Mariana Boadella*, Christian Gortázar, Joaquín Vicente and Francisco Ruiz-Fons

Author affiliations

IREC (CSIC-UCLM-JCCM), Ronda de Toledo s/n, Ciudad Real, Spain

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Citation and License

BMC Veterinary Research 2012, 8:7  doi:10.1186/1746-6148-8-7

Published: 17 January 2012

Abstract

Background

The goal of this study was describing the temporal evolution of Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) contact prevalence among Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) populations under different management regimes and contact likelihoods with domestic pigs. Given the recent increase in wild boar abundance throughout Europe, we hypothesized that wild boar contact with ADV would remain stable in time even after significant reduction of ADV prevalence in domestic pigs.

Results

Sera from 1659 wild boar were collected from 2000 to 2010 within 6 areas of the Iberian Peninsula and tested for the presence of antibodies against ADV by ELISA. According to sampling date, wild boar were grouped into three time periods. ADV prevalence was compared through period both globally and by geographic area. Overall seroprevalence for the ten-year study period was 49.6 ± 2.4%. The highest seroprevalence was recorded in areas with intense wild boar management. The annual proportion of positive wild boar sampling sites remained stable through the study period, while the percentage of domestic pig AD positive counties decreased from 70% in 2003 to 1.7% in 2010.

Conclusions

Results presented herein confirmed our hypothesis that ADV would remain almost stable in wild boar populations. This evidences the increasing risk wild boar pose in the final stages of ADV eradication in pigs and for wildlife conservation.

Keywords:
Disease control; Monitoring; Pseudorabies; Seroprevalence; Sus scrofa; Wildlife