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Open Access Research article

In-vitro comparison of LC-DCP- and LCP-constructs in the femur of newborn calves – a pilot study

Mona Hoerdemann1, Philippe Gédet2, Steven J Ferguson2, Carola Sauter-Louis1 and Karl Nuss3*

Author affiliations

1 Clinic for Ruminants, University of Munich, Munich, Germany

2 Institute for Surgical Technology and Biomechanics, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland

3 Department of Farm Animals, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland

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Citation and License

BMC Veterinary Research 2012, 8:139  doi:10.1186/1746-6148-8-139

Published: 21 August 2012

Abstract

Background

To compare the biomechanical in-vitro characteristics of limited-contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) and locking compression plate (LCP) constructs in an osteotomy gap model of femoral fracture in neonatal calves. Pairs of intact femurs from 10 calves that had died for reasons unrelated to the study were tested. A 7-hole LC-DCP with six 4.5 mm cortical screws was used in one femur and a 7-hole LCP with four 5.0 mm locking and two 4.5 mm cortical screws was used in the corresponding femur. The constructs were tested to failure by cyclic compression at a speed of 2 mm/s within six increasing force levels.

Results

The bone-thread interface was stripped in 21 of 80 cortical screws (26.3%) before a pre-set insertion torque of 3 Nm was achieved. Only 3 corresponding intact pairs of constructs could be statistically compared for relative structural stiffness, actuator excursion and width of the osteotomy gap. Relative structural stiffness was significantly greater, actuator excursion and width of the osteotomy gap were significantly smaller in the LCP constructs. While failure occurred by loosening of the screws in the LC-DCP constructs, locking constructs failed by cutting large holes in the soft distal metaphyseal bone.

Conclusions

An insertion torque sufficient to provide adequate stability in femurs of newborn calves could not be achieved reliably with 4.5 mm cortical screws. Another limiting factor for both constructs was the weak cancellous bone of the distal fracture fragment. LCP constructs were significantly more resistant to compression than LC-DCP constructs.