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Open Access Research article

Molecular characterization and phylogenetic study of peste des petits ruminants viruses from North central States of Nigeria

Pam D Luka12*, Joseph Erume1, Frank N Mwiine3, Chrisostom Ayebazibwe4 and David Shamaki5

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Parasitology and Microbiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Makerere University, Kampala, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda

2 Biochemistry and Applied Molecular Biology Division, National Veterinary Research Institute, PMB 1 Vom, Nigeria

3 Department of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Makerere University, Kampala, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda

4 Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, P.O. Box 513, Entebbe, Uganda

5 Directorate of Research, National Veterinary Research Institute, PMB 1 Vom, Nigeria

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BMC Veterinary Research 2011, 7:32  doi:10.1186/1746-6148-7-32

Published: 4 July 2011

Abstract

Background

Peste des petits ruminants is an endemic disease of sheep and goats in Nigeria and vaccination has been the method of control but sporadic outbreaks have been reported. This study was carried out to characterize PPR viruses from outbreaks in 2007 and 2009 from Kaduna and Plateau States.

Results

Of the 33 clinical samples analysed, 51.52% (n = 17) were positive for F protein gene primers (F1/F2). All the samples had a sequence similarity of 98-100% among them and 92-97% with the reference vaccine (Nig 75/1) strain. The deduced amino acid homology ranges between 96.3-99.7%. Phylogenetically all the Nigerian sequences cluster with Nig 75/1 and Nig 76/1 in lineage 1.

Conclusions

PPR is still a problem in Kaduna and Plateau States of Nigeria. The strains involved were genetically closely related to the vaccine strain (Nig 75/1) used in the country. Based on this study, the continued outbreaks in the Country is not due to the efficacy of the vaccine. Therefore, to achieve effective control and possibly eradication of PPR in Nigeria, the current control strategies should be revisited.