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Open Access Research article

Acceptance of illness and satisfaction with life among malaria patients in rivers state, Nigeria

Katarzyna Van Damme-Ostapowicz1*, Elżbieta Krajewska-Kułak1, Paul JC Nwosu2, Wojciech Kułak3, Marek Sobolewski4 and Romuald Olszański5

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Integrated Medical Care, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

2 Madonna Institute of Tropical Medicine (Hygiene, Blood) and Pandemics, Madonna University, Elele, Nigeria

3 Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation, Medical University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland

4 Chair of Quantitative Methods, University of Technology in Rzeszów, Rzeszów, Poland

5 Department of Maritime and Tropical Medicine, Military Medical Institute, Gdynia, Poland

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BMC Health Services Research 2014, 14:202  doi:10.1186/1472-6963-14-202

Published: 3 May 2014

Abstract

Background

Health condition is one of the basic factors affecting satisfaction with life, and the level of illness acceptance. The purpose of the study was to analyse the level of illness acceptance, the level of satisfaction with life among malaria patients, and the level of trust placed in the physician and the nurse.

Methods

The study employs the method of diagnostic survey based on standardised AIS and SWLS scales, as well as Anderson and Dedrick’s PPTS and PNTS scales.

Results

The average AIS level was 12 points, while the average level of SwL at the SWLS scale was 16.5 points. The average level of trust in the physician and the nurse amounted to 50.6 points and 51.4 points, respectively. The correlation between the level of illness acceptance and self-evaluated satisfaction with life was statistically significant, with R = 0.56. The marital status influenced the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05 and the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05. The employment status affected the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05 and the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05.

Conclusions

The majority of malaria patients did not accept their illness, while the level of satisfaction with life was low. The majority of respondents trusted their physician and nurse. There is a statistically significant correlation between the level of illness acceptance and the self-evaluated satisfaction with life. The marital status had a statistically significant effect on the acceptance of illness and the satisfaction with life. The individuals who had a job demonstrated higher levels of quality of life and illness acceptance.

Keywords:
Acceptance of illness; Satisfaction with life; Malaria