Table 1

Sample Description (N = 24,017)
Variable N %
Age, Mean (SD) 61.3 (9.4)
  40–49 2,415 10.1%
  50–59 7,899 32.9%
  60–64 4,922 20.5%
  65–69 4,028 16.8%
  70+ 4,753 19.8%
Gender
  Male 11,631 48.4%
  Female 12,386 51.6%
Education
  High school or less 4,211 17.5%
  Some college 9,314 38.8%
  College degree 4,178 17.4%
  > College degree 6,314 26.3%
Income
  < 25 K 3,143 14.7%
  ≥ 25K < 50K 5,862 27.4%
  ≥50K < 75K 4,884 22.9%
  ≥75K < 100K 3,252 15.2%
  ≥100K 4,215 19.7%
Race
  White 22,421 94.5%
  Black 521 2.2%
  Hispanic 176 0.7%
  Other 620 2.6%
Health
  Fair/Poor 7,934 33.0%
  Good 10,028 41.7%
  Very good/Excellent 6,055 25.2%
Index Chronic Disease/Medication
  Asthma 1,773 7.4%
  Diabetes 3,098 12.9%
  Hyperlipidemia 4,639 19.3%
  Hypertension 10,199 42.5%
  Osteoporosis 3,073 12.8%
  Depression 1,235 5.1%
Mean SD
Medication Beliefs Scoresa
  Perceived need for medications 81.9 14.6
  Perceived medication concerns 66.7 21.9
  Perceived medication affordability 61.4 30.1

a Multi-item scales were created for medication beliefs scales by summing raw items into a scale score and linearly transforming each sum to a 0–100 metric, with 100 representing the most favorable belief (highest perceived need, fewest perceived concerns, highest perceived affordability), 0 the least favorable, and scores in between representing the percentage of the total possible score.

Gadkari and McHorney

Gadkari and McHorney BMC Health Services Research 2012 12:98   doi:10.1186/1472-6963-12-98

Open Data