Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Evidence based practice beliefs and implementation among nurses: a cross-sectional study

Kjersti Stokke1*, Nina R Olsen2, Birgitte Espehaug2 and Monica W Nortvedt2

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, Surgery and Transplantation, Oslo University Hospital, Postbox 4953- Nydalen, Oslo N-0424, Norway

2 Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, Postbox 7030, Bergen N-5020, Norway

For all author emails, please log on.

BMC Nursing 2014, 13:8  doi:10.1186/1472-6955-13-8

Published: 25 March 2014

Abstract

Background

Having a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice and being able to see the value of evidence-based practice for patients have been reported as important for the implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses.

The aim of this study was to map self-reported beliefs towards EBP and EBP implementation among nurses, and to investigate whether there was a positive correlation between EBP beliefs and EBP implementation.

Method

We carried out a cross-sectional study among 356 nurses at a specialist hospital for the treatment of cancer in Norway. The Norwegian translations of the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale and the Evidence-based Practice Implementation Scale were used.

Results

In total, 185 nurses participated in the study (response rate 52%). The results showed that nurses were positive towards evidence-based practice, but only practised it to a small extent. There was a positive correlation (r) between beliefs towards evidence-based practice and implementation of evidence-based practice (r = 0.59, p = 0.001).

There was a statistical significant positive, but moderate correlation between all the four subscales of the EBP Beliefs Scale (beliefs related to: 1) knowledge, 2) resources, 3) the value of EBP and 4) difficulty and time) and the EBP Implementation Scale, with the highest correlation observed for beliefs related to knowledge (r = 0.38, p < .0001). Participants who had learned about evidence-based practice had significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants who were unfamiliar with evidence-based practice. Those involved in evidence-based practice working groups also reported significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants not involved in these groups.

Conclusion

This study shows that nurses have a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice, but practise it to a lesser extent. There was a positive correlation between beliefs about evidence-based practice and implementation of evidence-based practice. Beliefs related to knowledge appear to have the greatest effect on implementation of evidence-based practice. Having knowledge and taking part in evidence-based practice working groups seem important.

Keywords:
Evidence-based practice; Beliefs; Behaviour; Implementation; Nurses; Survey