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Open Access Highly Accessed Research article

Open source challenges for hospital information system (HIS) in developing countries: a pilot project in Mali

Cheick-Oumar Bagayoko12*, Jean-Charles Dufour2, Saad Chaacho3, Omar Bouhaddou4 and Marius Fieschi2

  • * Corresponding author: Cheick-Oumar Bagayoko cob281@yahoo.fr

  • † Equal contributors

Author Affiliations

1 DER Santé Publique, Faculté de Médecine, Pharmacie et d'Odonto-Stomatologie, Bamako, Mali

2 Laboratoire d'Enseignement et de Recherche sur le Traitement de l'Information Médicale, Faculté de Médecine, Université de la Méditerranée 27, boulevard Jean Moulin 13385 Marseille Cedex 5, France

3 Unité de Veille Technologique et de Développement Logiciel, Centre Hospitalier Ibn Sina de Rabat, Maroc

4 Hewlett Packard Enterprise Services and Department of Veterans Affairs, San Diego - CA, USA

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BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 2010, 10:22  doi:10.1186/1472-6947-10-22

Published: 16 April 2010

Abstract

Background

We are currently witnessing a significant increase in use of Open Source tools in the field of health. Our study aims to research the potential of these software packages for developing countries. Our experiment was conducted at the Centre Hospitalier Mere Enfant in Mali.

Methods

After reviewing several Open Source tools in the field of hospital information systems, Mediboard software was chosen for our study. To ensure the completeness of Mediboard in relation to the functionality required for a hospital information system, its features were compared to those of a well-defined comprehensive record management tool set up at the University Hospital "La Timone" of Marseilles in France. It was then installed on two Linux servers: a first server for testing and validation of different modules, and a second one for the deployed full implementation. After several months of use, we have evaluated the usability aspects of the system including feedback from end-users through a questionnaire.

Results

Initial results showed the potential of Open Source in the field of health IT for developing countries like Mali.

Five main modules have been fully implemented: patient administrative and medical records management of hospital activities, tracking of practitioners' activities, infrastructure management and the billing system. This last component of the system has been fully developed by the local Mali team.

The evaluation showed that the system is broadly accepted by all the users who participated in the study. 77% of the participants found the system useful; 85% found it easy; 100% of them believe the system increases the reliability of data. The same proportion encourages the continuation of the experiment and its expansion throughout the hospital.

Conclusions

In light of the results, we can conclude that the objective of our study was reached. However, it is important to take into account the recommendations and the challenges discussed here to avoid several potential pitfalls specific to the context of Africa.

Our future work will target the full integration of the billing module in Mediboard and an expanded implementation throughout the hospital.